Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Judges announced for prestigious Parkin Drawing Award

25 February 2013

Judges announced for prestigious Parkin Drawing Award

The judging panel consisting of recognised art practitioners, arts commentators and academics have been selected for The Parkin Prize national drawing award.

The award attracting a major prize of $20,000 was launched by Chris Parkin, arts patron and owner of Museum Art Hotel in Wellington in October last year.

Parkin has committed to funding The Parkin Prize for an initial five year period. Entries are now open to anyone living permanently in New Zealand.

An advisory panel, consisting of Senior Lecturer in Painting at the University of Canterbury Roger Boyce, Senior Lecture at School of Fine Arts at Massey University Simon Morris, painter Seraphine Pick and former curator of contemporary art at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, Mercedes Vicente, will select the finalists for the exhibition at the NZ Academy of Fine Arts (26 July to 25 August 2013).

The winning submission will be selected and announced by judge, Associate Professor and Head of the School of Fine Arts at Massey University, Heather Galbraith on 25 July 2013 at the opening of the Parkin Drawing Prize exhibition.

“We want The Parkin Prize to be an award that is respected by the arts community and recognised by the general public as a national award of significance in support of drawing in New Zealand. It is imperative we have an advisory panel and judge who are respected and recognised nationally for their expertise,” said Parkin.

The competition, in association with the New Zealand Academy of Fine Arts, will promote excellence and innovation in drawing in all its forms (processes, materials and ideas) and aims to play an important role in fostering New Zealand drawing practice.

‘I am looking forward to overseeing an art award that is so clearly based on the interests of artists and their practice. We have an advisory panel and judge who bring the experience and acumen to the task at hand, as well as an enthusiasm and passion for the potential of what drawing can be,’ said Warren Feeney

Entries close 5pm 21 June 2013. Forms and full details are available at www.parkinprize.org.nz.

The Parkin Prize Advisory Panel:

Roger Boyce

Roger Boyce is senior lecturer in Painting at the University of Canterbury School of Fine Arts and previously taught at Smith College, Princeton University and Carnegie Mellon University. His work has been featured in exhibitions at Sao Paulo Bienal, Brazil and the New Museum of Contemporary Art in New York and he has paintings in the collections of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Lubelski Foundation in Germany. Boyce is well-known in New Zealand as both a painter and art critic/commentator.

Simon Morris

Simon Morris is a senior lecturer at Massey University’s School of Fine Arts. Morris’ work is often site specific and blurs traditional boundaries between drawing, sculpture and architecture. Morris contributed to the international exhibition of wall drawings at the Australian Centre for Contemporary Art in Melbourne and has completed numerous commissions, including work for The New Dowse and the University of Otago’s School of Medicine and Health Science.

Seraphine Pick

Seraphine Pick is one of the country’s best-known painters. In 2009, a 15 year touring survey of her work confirmed the imaginative and evocative nature of an arts practice that frequently alluded to personal and private lives. She has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Olivia Spencer Bower Foundation Art Award (1994), the Rita Angus Cottage Artist-in-Residence (1995), and the Frances Hodgkins Fellow at the University of Otago (1999). Her work is held in private, public and corporate collections throughout New Zealand.

Mercedes Vicento

Mercedes Vicento is an independent curator and art critic from New York, currently living and working in New Zealand. She was the Curator of Contemporary Art at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery until 2012 and has held a curatorial position in the Whitney Museum of American Art. Vicente completed a Masters Degree in Film and the Arts at New York University and in Curatorial Studies at Bard College. She has written for numerous arts publications, including; Exit, Lapiz, Manifesta Journal and Broadsheet. Vicente was co-editor of the anthology of writings by Benjamin D. H. Buchloh titled Formalismo e historicidad, (Akal, Spain 2004).

Judge 2013: Heather Galbraith

Heather Galbriath is Associate Professor and Head of Massey University School of Fine Arts Massey University. She was previously Senior Curator at the Museum of New Zealand – Te Papa Tongarewa and Curator of Contemporary Art at City Gallery Wellington. In addition, she has served on multiple advisory boards and maintains an ongoing international curatorial research portfolio. In 2009 she was co-curator of New Zealand’s Venice Biennale project and was deputy commissioner for New Zealand in Venice that same year. She has a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Elam School of Fine Arts at Auckland University and a master’s degree from the University of London's Goldsmiths College.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news