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Extra Performance Date for the Man Who Planted Trees

Media Release
27 February, 2013
Extra Performance Date for the Man Who Planted Trees

Due to popular demand, Auckland Arts Festival announces an extra performance of The Man Who Planted Trees on Friday 8 March, 6pm, Auckland Town Hall


Huge interest in the funny and captivating theatre show The Man Who Planted Trees has resulted in an extra performance being scheduled at the Auckland Arts Festival 2013. In addition to two performances on 9 March, there will now also be a performance on 8 March at 6pm.

The Man Who Planted Trees, the brainchild of Scotland’s innovative Puppet State Theatre Company, is a delightful, award-winning production based on French author Jean Giono’s environmental cult classic about the difference one person can make to the world.

Elzéard Bouffier is a shepherd who, accompanied by his faithful dog, sets out amidst the ravages of war to cultivate a forest and transform a barren landscape. Bouffier lives a solitary life and devotes much of his time to planting trees, acorn by acorn, throughout the countryside. Over the years, his efforts produce a thriving forest across one French region and change it for the better. The multi-sensory story is told with delightful handmade puppets, dynamic storytelling, choreography, wind that really blows, rain that really sprinkles and the real fresh-lavender smell of the French countryside.

Of the original 1953 classic tale, author Jean Giono said, "I wrote this story to make people love trees, or more precisely to make people love planting trees. Of all my stories it is one of the ones of which I am most proud.”
The Man Who Planted Trees has been performed over a thousand times since opening in 2006, in venues from tents on windswept hillsides, tiny village halls on remote Scottish islands, to the Lincoln Center Institute and the Sydney Opera House.

Show The Man Who Planted Trees
Where Concert Chamber, Auckland Town Hall
When New performance date: Fri 8 Mar at 6pm
Existing performance date: Sat 9 Mar at 10.30am & 1.30pm
Duration 1hr
Age Suitable for adults and children ages 7+
Price GA Adult $20 / GA Child $12
Bookings Book at THE EDGE: 357 3355 / 0800 289 842

Social Media Facebook:
Twitter: @Aklfestival
Media enquiries Siobhan Waterhouse, Publicist
P: +64 (0)9 374 0317 | M: +64 (0) 22 126 4149 | E:


Adapted from Jean Giono’s story by: Ailie Cohen, Richard Medrington, Rick Conte
Director: Ailie Cohen
Performers: Rick Conte and Richard Medrington
Set and puppet design: Ailie Cohen
Lighting design: Elspeth Murray
Sound design: Barney Strachan

With support from Creative Scotland

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