Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


One Arm No Barrier for Ironman Nick Bailey

ONE ARM NO BARRIER FOR IRONMAN NICK BAILEY

Triathlon is a sport with many great stories and ordinary people who are achieving what appears to be the impossible. One of those stories is Nick Bailey who will this weekend line up at the Kellogg’s Nutri-Grain IRONMAN New Zealand.

Nick is your everyday Kiwi male, in his fifties and knocking close to 90kg he decided he would train for and race in an Ironman. The big difference is Nick only has one arm.

Nick lost his left arm in an accident when aged 24, coming out second best to a forklift when working in Antarctica. But it wasn’t the lack of an arm that worried Nick most bout taking on Ironman, it was an arthritic knee that required surgery 18 months ago and may yet require replacing.

Bailey is a very familiar face within Manawatu's sporting community; he is owner operator of the Manawatu Action Indoor Sports Centre.

He admits to a tough time in the past year as he balanced training, work and some personal setbacks along the way.

“I guess the hardest part of my journey was the first couple of months. I pretty well had to start with no fitness base at all; I was knocking 90 kilos after a couple of years of little or no activity. Then I had to carry some weight on a pretty bad knee, which despite an operation eighteen months ago may need replacing.

“Once I was through the first couple of months of training and was coping in that aspect reasonably well, the next 8 months or so brought more challenges. Losing my mother in July was a bit of hiccup you might say. She pretty well brought me up since I was 13 year old when I lost my father. This will be a big motivation for me; the poor old girl spent her last months in a dementia unit and carried the first article from the Manawatu Standard around in her stroller everywhere.”

It is not only the memory of his parents and in particular his Mum that Nick will carry with him on Saturday though, he suffered further heartache when losing a good mate.

“I also lost a cycling buddy Doug Mabey in the New Year; he was out on a ride I was supposed to do with him so I have found that particularly hard. The memory of these two people will make the pain easier on the day though I reckon.”

It is with a healthy sense of irony and with Nick’s devilish sense of humour that he talks up his strongest part of the day.

“I have spent most of my training on the first two disciplines and I hate to say that my swimming - if I go straight, could be my strongest part of the day. I don’t swim in circles generally but I am a little worried that when I put my foot down on the swim I could end up in Kinloch!”

Cycling does present its challenges with Nick having a specially built bike and is ready to walk and run the marathon to finish his day – although he won’t have his regular walking companions alongside.

“I’m not sure where I am in my cycling. Before Christmas I would have said around a six and a half hour ride but a couple of crashes and problems with numbness in my hand might slow me down a little. I have had radical changes to the bike and grown a ‘cycling arm’.

“The run walk I have surprised myself from not been able to run to now looking at running a kilometre then walk a kilometre. I pretty much spent most of the training time walking my three dogs, I only have to walk into the house in cycling gear and they go crazy for a walk.”

Nick does get serious though when talking about inspiring others with disabilities who might otherwise be frightened of becoming involved to take up sport, anything that might interest them.

“As a role model I have always tried to use my disability to highlight the positive. My life has been based around sport; I have been working in indoor sports game since 1990. At my age I would like to encourage other people with disabilities and health issue to get into sports. I say use it or lose it, give it a go!”

And he may not be finished once he crosses the line sometime on Saturday afternoon in Taupo.

“Beyond ironman…. hmmmm, I’m not sure. Perhaps a disabled multisport event the length of New Zealand. I’m sure there are more crazy people out there who might want to join me!”

Nick’s race gets underway at 7am on Saturday morning in Taupo.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Obituary: Andrew Little Remembers Murray Ball

“Murray mined a rich vein of New Zealand popular culture and exported it to the world. Wal and Dog and all the other Kiwi characters he crafted through Footrot Flats were hugely popular here and in Australia, Europe and North America." More>>

ALSO:

Organised Choas: NZ Fringe Festival 2017 Awards

Three more weeks of organised chaos have come to an end with the Wellington NZ Fringe Arts Festival Awards Ceremony as a chance to celebrate all our Fringe artists for their talent, ingenuity, and chutzpah! More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Wellington Writer Wins $US165,000 Literature Prize

Victoria University of Wellington staff member and alumna Ashleigh Young has won a prestigious Windham-Campbell Literature Prize worth USD$165,000 for her book of essays Can You Tolerate This? More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: We’re All Lab Rats

A couple of years ago, there were reports that Silicon Valley executives were sending their children to tech-free schools. It was a story that dripped of irony: geeks in the heart of techno-utopia rejecting their ideology when it came to their own kids. But the story didn’t catch on, and an awkward question lingered. Why were the engineers of the future desperate to part their gadgets from their children? More>>

  • CensusAtSchool - Most kids have no screen-time limits
  • Netsafe - Half of NZ high school students unsupervised online
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news