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It’s official – the chicken came first

18 March 2013

It’s official – the chicken came first
ChildFund New Zealand solves one of Easter’s biggest mysteries

For centuries humanity has pondered the age-old question: ‘Which came first? The chicken or the egg?’, and this Easter ChildFund can reveal that it is in fact the chicken.

While the question of chickens and eggs might be tongue in cheek, the benefits of both are 100 per cent worthwhile for those in need.

A brood of 15 baby chicks has the ability for families to produce, consume or sell up to 3600 eggs each year, so it really is a ‘gift with purchase’.

Baby chicks have long been a hot Easter favourite among Kiwis trying to avoid calorie laden treats, and have featured in the top five choices of ChildFund’s Gifts that Grow purchases since the catalogue began in 2006, with over 56,000 being gifted to families in need in the developing world.

ChildFund New Zealand Chief Executive Paul Brown says the benefit of a small brood of chicks for a family is long lasting and makes a big difference to everyday life.

“This gift is able to help families in so many ways, as their 15 baby chicks not only provide nutritious food for children, but also much needed income for their families”.

“For those living in poverty this Easter, these little chicks contribute a huge amount to families and have a major impact on their children’s quality of life”.

Purchase a brood of 15 baby chicks for a family in need for just $57 this Easter. Purchasers receive a special gift card explaining the gift and how it will benefit the recipient.

To order ChildFund Gifts That Grow visit www.childfund.org.nz or call 0800 223 111.

ENDS


About ChildFund New Zealand
ChildFund New Zealand is a member of the ChildFund Alliance, an international child development organisation with more than 70 years of experience helping the world's neediest children, which works in 54 countries, assisting 16 million children and family members regardless of race, creed or gender.

ChildFund New Zealand works for the well-being of children by supporting locally led initiatives that strengthen families and communities, helping them overcome poverty and protect the rights of their children.

ChildFund's comprehensive programmes incorporate health, education, nutrition and livelihood interventions that sustainably protect, nurture and develop children. ChildFund works in any environment where poverty, conflict and disaster threaten the well-being of children.

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