Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Finalists announced for youth film comp


Finalists announced for youth film comp

The finalists of Auckland Council’s young filmmakers competition have been announced and their three minute flicks on Auckland’s future are up online.

A judging panel, including Councillor Michael Goudie, Bobby Nairn, Morgan Borthwick and Jee Kim revealed the finalists today:

• Matthew Canham (17 years) of Campbells Bay and Georgia Nixon (18 years) of Narrowneck
The Future – Stefan Crabbe (14 years) of Orewa, Aimee Mills (14 years) of Red Beach, Jasmine Bishop (13 years) and Yasmin Pena (14 years) of Whangaparaoa
Generation Zero – Sam Dyson (20 years) of Howick, Aymee Karaitiana (20 years), Amenda Quang (20 years) of Northpark and Ryan Mearns (19 years) of Mt Eden
Side Project – Ben Journee (24 years) of Murrays Bay and Mikayla Fairweather (22 years)
• Nathan Thomas (23 years) of Te Atatu

The five finalists’ videos can be seen on You Tube at youtube.com/aklcouncil where the public can "like" their favourite.

The video with the most views on You Tube by 31 May, when the feedback period ends, wins a $3,000 Prezzy Card. Second place will receive a $2,000 Prezzy Card and third place a $1,000 Prezzy Card.

The contest was to create a three-minute video on Auckland’s future to coincide with the release of the Council’s Unitary Plan – the rulebook that will shape the way Auckland grows.

Entrants were as young as five years old and one team of finalists is aged 13 and 14 years.

Councillor Michael Goudie says he was blown away with the high standard of the 35 entries.

“This is their future and it is encouraging to see they have such a great vision of what sort of Auckland they want in 30 years’ time. It’s definitely in line with Auckland becoming the world’s most liveable city.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news