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An evening with Neil Finn, Conrad Smith and Peter Urlich

‘So They Can’ charity announces an evening with Neil Finn, Conrad Smith and Peter Urlich

‘So They Can’, a charity set up to help some of the poorest children in Africa, is pleased to announce its annual fundraiser – An evening with Neil Finn, Conrad Smith and Peter Urlich, with all proceeds going towards making sustainable, community-focused changes in Africa.

This event is set to be an extraordinary and unique evening not to be missed, with a live performance from Neil Finn, a speech from All Black Conrad Smith who has spent time in Africa with ‘So They Can’, and DJ Peter Urlich who will have guests dancing until late.

Since it was founded in 2009, ‘So They Can’ has brought about fantastic change for children and orphans in Africa. The charity has built a primary school that currently educates 520 children, as well as a secondary school, which will together have educated 840 children by 2017. ‘So They Can’ has also built an orphanage that currently houses over 120 children, aged from 3-7, who once lived at the local dumpsite; and will continue to deliver business classes to the adult population and finance them into profitable businesses.

An evening with Neil Finn, Conrad Smith and Peter Urlich

Friday 12 April, 6:30pm

Aotea Centre, 50 Mayoral Drive, Auckland

Tickets are available now at sotheycanauckland.eventbrite.co.nz. Tables of ten ($3,500) or single tickets available, include canapés, a three-course meal, alcohol and entertainment.

The evening will also feature a raffle to win a beautiful diamond, and very special silent and loud auctions with superb items to win including a luxury holiday on the Gold Coast, weekend escapes to Queenstown and beyond, contemporary and fine art and much more.

About ‘So They Can’

So They Can was founded in 2009 after Cassandra Treadwell visited a refugee camp in Kenya, where over 7,000 people were living in tents. They faced dire poverty with little or no food, water, health care or education. Community leaders asked for a school for their children’s future: their request became the inspiration.

So far, So They Can has built a primary school that currently educates 520 children and by 2017 will educate 840 who will then attend So They Can’s secondary school; as well as an orphanage that currently houses over 120 children, aged from 3-7, who once lived at the local dumpsite. So They Can also delivers business classes to the adult population and finances them into profitable businesses.

So They Can’s focus is to invest in Africa rather than provide aid. It works with communities in severe need; empowering people to become self-sufficient. The ultimate goal is that the knowledge and skills it provides will help develop the future leaders of these communities and help them break the poverty cycle permanently.
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