Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


NZSO pays tribute to our Anzac heroes

20 March 2013

NZSO pays tribute to our Anzac heroes

Commemorate the spirit of Anzac with your national orchestra and enjoy three inspiring works by composers from Australia, New Zealand and England.

We begin On Anzac Eve with a salute across the Tasman to our closest allies. Sydney-born composer Ross Edwards’ Symphony No.1 Da Pacem Domine was conceived and partly composed during the Gulf Crisis.

The Symphony evolves slowly and organically over a deep insistent rhythmic pulse. “It is thus, in effect, a sort of massive orchestral chant of quiet intensity into which my subjective feelings of grief and foreboding about some of the great threats to humanity: war, pestilence, and environmental devastation, have been subsumed into the broader context of ritual,” says Edwards.

During its composition, Edwards’ Symphony No.1 became a threnody for Stuart Challender, the Chief Conductor of the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, who died shortly after its completion. Dedicated to Stuart’s memory, the work speaks of the fragility of peace and takes its poignant title from the hymn-like episode based on a fragment of the plainsong Da Pacem Domine (Give Peace, Lord).

We return to Aotearoa for Till Human Voices Wake Us, composed by NZSO Chief Executive, Christopher Blake. Originally commissioned by the NZSO and Radio New Zealand, for broadcast on International Music Day in 1986, its composition was also inspired by the International Year for Peace.

Blake’s interest in historical and political issues reveals itself in both the title and text of this impressive work. Named after a novel by the pacifist Ian Hamilton, which was originally inspired by T.S. Eliot’s final line in The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, Blake’s libretto was gathered from anti-war activist Archibald Baxter’s autobiography We Will Not Cease.

The opening crash foreshadows a sense of doom before a lone trumpet fanfare evokes the courageous spirit of Anzac with its stirring repetition of the perfect fifth of the Last Post. Another crash introduces the strings and eventually the full Orchestra before Baxter’s prose, originally sung by notable New Zealand tenor Christopher Doig and this time performed by Australian James Egglestone, powerfully enters amidst a sea of jagged orchestration. This work is a passionate plea for peace, dedicated to Blake’s son Timothy.

Comfort is found in English composer Edward Elgar’s famous Enigma Variations. This recognisable work, dedicated to "my friends pictured within", established Elgar’s reputation. Written almost 100 years before the other programmed works, it is a sincere expression of friendship and love – the very basis of our own Anzac spirit.

The ‘Spirit of Anzac’ was forged when Australians and New Zealanders (Australian and New Zealand Army Corps) stood side by side as comrades through two world wars. It stands for values of courage, camaraderie, compassion and commitment.

We welcome you to join New Zealand conductor Tecwyn Evans, well-known actor (and concert presenter) Peter Elliot, and your national orchestra, in honouring this Anzac spirit, to celebrate courage, selflessness and service wherever it happens in our communities.

NZSO On Anzac Eve

Tecwyn Evans Conductor
James Egglestone Tenor
Peter Elliott Readings

ROSS EDWARDS (AUS) Symphony No. 1 Da Pacem Domine
CHRISTOPHER BLAKE (NZ) Till Human Voices Wake Us
EDWARD ELGAR (ENG) Enigma Variations, Op. 36

WELLINGTON / Michael Fowler Centre / Wednesday 24 April / 6.30pm

Proud to commemorate the WW1 centenary in 2014.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Cyclists Net First NZ Gold

New Zealand won a gold meal and two bronzes on the first day of the Commonwealth Games. There was joy and heartbreak in an incredibly full day of sport. Here's how the New Zealanders fared. More>>

Cap Bocage: Anti-Mining Campaign Doco Debuts At NZ Film Festival

Playing at this year’s New Zealand International Film Festival, Cap Bocage is a close-up exploration of the forces that came into play when environmental issues and indigenous rights became intertwined in New Caledonia ... More>>

Film Fest:

More Film:

Sharon Ellis Review: A View From The Bridge

Arthur Miller’s A View From the Bridge is Circa’s latest big production, it opened on Saturday 19 July and it is a stunning triumph. More>>

Māori Language Week: He Karanga Kia Kaha Ake Te Tīhau Ki Te Reo Māori

The Māori Language Commission wishes to see social media swamped with Māori language tweets and messages for Te Wiki o te Reo Māori using the hashtag #tekupu. More>>

ALSO:

Book Vote: Kiwis Prefer Young Adult & Classics

To compile their Top 100 List for 2014, Whitcoulls again asked New Zealanders to vote for their favourite books and authors. And while classic novels continue to appeal to Kiwi readers, 2014 marks a significant new trend – the increasing popularity of novels for young adults. More>>

ALSO:

Five NZ Cities: Bill Bailey Back To The Southern Hemisphere

The gap between how we imagine our lives to be and how they really are is the subject of Bill’s new show Limboland. With his trademark intelligence and sharp wit, he tells tales of finding himself in this halfway place. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Book Television Is Coming

Carole Beu of The Women’s Bookshop in Auckland, Graham Beattie of The Book Blog and producer Deb Faith of FaceTV have raised enough money via crowd funding at Boosted – just under $7,000 so far – for 12 episodes, which begin production in September, and will be on screen later that month. More>>

Electric Sheep: Light Nelson Exceeds All Expectations

Light Nelson exceeded all expectations drawing over 40,000 people over two nights to the Queens Gardens and surrounds. The event, with over 40 installations from local and national artists, is in its second year, and organisers were hoping they’d top last year’s crowd of 16,000. More>>

MacGyver: Richard Dean Anderson To Attend Armageddon This October

New Zealand’s biggest pulp-culture event, the Armageddon Expo is proud to announce the world’s most recognised DIY action hero will be attending the Auckland event at the ASB Showgrounds from October 24th to 27th. More>>

ALSO:

Barbershop Gold: Māori Party Singing Praises Of The Musical Island Boys

The Maori Party has congratulated four young men on a mission, who in 2002 took up barbershop singing at Tawa College, and tonight took out the Gold Medal in the 2014 International Barbershop Harmony Society competitions in Las Vegas. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news