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Giselle and the Fate of Wahine

Giselle and the Fate of Wahine


It was a day before Easter, April 1968, when journalist Emma Cassidy boarded the inter-island ferry, Wahine, sailing from Christchurch’s port of Lyttelton to Wellington. On the bridge Captain Angus Robertson, after reading a satisfactory weather report on Cyclone Giselle, orders Wahine’s departure. The ship, with over 300 passengers and crew, makes her way up the eastern coastline of New Zealand battling high seas and torrential rain - not the uneventful night crossing expected. Unbeknown to Robertson, Giselle had changed her course and was heading directly for the ferry. Wellington Harbor Master, Samuel Galloway reads the weather report and contacts Wahine informing Robertson of Giselle’s course change. As the ship fights the gigantic waves, unrelenting intense rain and a cyclonic wind, she is pushed off course.

Emma must now fight for not only her own life but for the lives of her cabin mate Janice Greenway, and a befriended family of three.

With the city of Wellington at a standstill, the entire nation waits for News of Wahine’s fate. Emma, not satisfied to just sit and wait, fights the apathy of other passengers and the reassurances of 1st officer Peter Knight and crew. Follow Emma, Robertson and Galloway as they fight the monster Giselle.

Marty Walpole was born and raised in Christchurch, New Zealand. At the young age of twenty-three, he headed across the Tasman Sea to Australia.

Living in Brisbane, Marty worked in the electroplating industry as well as teaching the martial art of Shodokan Aikido. It was his desire to excel in Aikido that led him to depart the Australian shores and head to Japan. Gaining a teaching diploma, Marty spent many years working as a teacher in public schools around the city of Osaka. It was through teaching English that Marty’s interest in writing was rekindled (in junior high and high school Marty enjoyed writing and telling stories).

After writing for various blogs and websites, he put all his energy into writing his first novella, Giselle and the Fate of Wahine. Today, he still resides in Japan with his Japanese wife and three children and is writing his next novel.


ends

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