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NZ Commuter Writes 1,500 Page Novel On Cellphone

Press Release –

NZ Commuter Writes 1,500 Page Novel On Cellphone

3 April 2013

Possibly New Zealand's largest ever novel has been published today by a Wellington journalist.

The 1,500 page novel, which is a quarter again longer than The Lord of the Rings has only been released as an eBook due to its size. Changels Genesis was written by Peter King over four years on an HTC smartphone mostly on his two 45-minute a day public transport commutes from the Hutt Valley and while his infant son fell asleep.

"For some reason I find writing fiction on the move easier than sitting at a desk," said Mr King.

But writing in public places does have its drawbacks.

"The story is highly emotional in places and every author feels the drama of the moment as he or she writes it. So, at times, I've been sitting there on the train blubbing away over some sad bit with other commuters wondering what I"m so upset about."

Published over the past four months as three books they were put together as a single volume because the trilogy is one single 90-chapter story. The book has been released in print in its three parts: Serendipity, Metamorphosis and Die Bruderschaft.

The trilogy is about a group of hoodie-clad minority teenagers who teleport around the world safeguarding teenaged future world leaders growing up in dangerous places including the Democratic Republic of Congo, Moldova and Washington DC. The hero and narrator is Sam Kahu from Northland, New Zealand, who’s early life was blighted by his gang-leader father killing his mother. But his fellow Changels, including: a Kurd, an Iranian Baha’i, a Vietnamese, a black American and a white Zimbabwean have all had to flee crime, politics or discrimination as well.

"I felt it was about time there were some minority superheroes. The science fiction element is really a plot device to talk about the world we live in."

The story weaves fact and fiction together and there is a seven page author’s note explaining what is real and what isn't. Mr King says he was inspired by the Belgian author Herge, who closely researched all his Tintin stories. At the same time there is a strong paranormal influence inspired by the X-files.

He says the underlying theme of the book is genetics, inheritance and identity and the questions genetic engineering will raise as inheritance gives way to choice. However he says making the language both accurate and accessible and the story compelling has been his main aim.

And no, he hasn’t finished yet. Changels is a series which will follow the protagonists into adulthood, so yes he can still be found writing on the train.

"When you're time poor it's about using every minute available," he says.

For background on the story visit the website


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