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Moa - Finalist In The 2013 New Zealand Science Book Prize

Moa - Finalist In The 2013 New Zealand Science Book Prize

Craig Potton Publishing is absolutely delighted to announce that Moa: the Life and Death of New Zealand’s Legendary Bird by Quinn Berentson is a finalist for the 2013 Royal Society of New Zealand Science Book Prize. The judges commented that Quinn Berentson’s book is ‘a scholarly and entertaining insight into the history and natural history of an extraordinary yet enigmatic extinct bird. It features larger than life historical personalities alongside the giant birds themselves, and provides great insights into Victorian science. It’s a good-looking book that goes in search of a multitude of tiny bits of historical and contemporary information about moa, and pulls them all into a revelatory and satisfying whole.’ The Royal Society of New Zealand Science Book Prize is a biennial book prize that aims to encourage the writing, publishing and reading of good and accessible popular science books. The 2013 overall winner will be announced at the Auckland Writers and Readers Festival on Saturday 18 May.

$49.99 250 x 200 mm, 200 pp, hardback ISBN: 9781877517846 Published: November 2012 Published by Craig Potton Publishing Moa is available from bookshops and libraries nationwide and online at www.craigpotton.co.nz 98 Vickerman Street, PO Box 555, Nelson 7010, New Zealand

Quinn Berentson is a writer, documentary film maker and photographer. After graduating with a B.Sc. Honours from Otago University he began writing and directing children’s educational television, before moving to Natural History New Zealand, where he wrote, directed and produced documentaries, working for such clients as Discovery Channel, National Geographic and Animal Planet. He continues to do this alongside other writing projects. He is based in Dunedin.
ENDS

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