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Paul Hartigan Exhibition


Paul Hartigan Exhibition


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Paul Hartigan (b. 1953)

Contemporary artist Paul Hartigan is recognized for his arresting large-scale public neon commissions. His dramatic orange monochrome Colony at the Faculty of Engineering on Symonds St won Best Public Sculpture Metro Awards in 2006. He attended Elam School of fine Art 1971-73 with teachers Colin McCahon, Robert Ellis and Garth Tapper.

“Newmarket was ablaze with neon advertising when I first visited Auckland during the summer of 1968 – I was completely captivated… I wanted to paint with light”

Known for creating unique neon artworks that bridge the gap between sculpture and lighting design, Hartigan also produces for exhibition related paintings, photographs and fine art prints from his Grey Lynn studio.

“Light and illumination are key elements in all that I do – Light is my artistic manifesto, my raison d’etre ¬“

With a career spanning over forty years, his artistic roots can be traced back to the forerunners of the American and British Pop movement. Hartigan’s progressive attitude, quirky sense of humour and mastery of an assorted range of media ensure that he continues to hold a central place in the New Zealand art scene.

“As a young artist I moved quickly from Picasso to Warhol, then onto Flavin and Indiana who used fluorescent and neon light to make art!”

His current work continues to push boundaries and challenge conceptions of both society and self in a visually arresting and timeless fashion. Paul Hartigan remains one of New Zealand’s most intriguing and inspirational artists.

“I like to mix things up, combine the unexpected – putting together the classical and the contemporary, matching and linking to create a brand new context – that’s what I do well, it’s exciting!

Paul Hartigan is represented in public and private collections throughout New Zealand including Te Papa Tongarewa, The Hocken and National Library, Auckland Art Gallery, Govett-Brewster and Sarjeant Art Gallery, The Gallery of Modern Art in Queensland, Australia.

ENDS

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