Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Mystery of the Gallipoli Bugle Solved


MEDIA RELEASE – 25 APRIL 2013
Seven Sharp

Mystery of the Gallipoli Bugle Solved

The mystery surrounding a World War I bugle played on the battlefields of Gallipoli may have been solved after a viewer recognised it on TVOne’s Seven Sharp last night.

The battered bugle is hand-inscribed with the places it had been and was handed in to the Auckland Regiment by a retired plumber, Paul Winstone. Mr Winstone found it while working under a Grey Lynn house while doing a job in 1963. Over the years he approached the Army Museum in Waiouru and the Auckland War Memorial Museum but neither was interested in it. It wasn’t until he approached the Auckland Army Centre that its significance was recognised.

Regimental Archivist Capt (Rtd) Blake Herbert says finding the bugle was very special. "When Paul contacted the Army Unit in Great North Road it sent chills up the back of my neck. You touch something like that and it's quite ghostly and spooky. To think the bugle has come back home - really just around the corner from where it lay under a house, it's amazing.”

Mr Herbert believes the bugle went to war in the possession of Sgt Sydney Postlewaight and would have been Army issued. It bears the crest of the Auckland Regiment and is hand inscribed with on the bell the ships that carried Sgt Postlewaight to Gallipoli. “It's a taonga.
It's covered in tiny engravings made by pin pricks. It tells a story.” He says the bugle probably survived the battlefields of Gallipoli the Somme and possibly Passchendaele.

Mr Herbert says it’s been a mystery as to how the bugle ended up under a house. However when it was featured on Seven Sharp last night it was recognised by Graham Milne of Hillcrest. Mr Milne believes his father Allen Milne took it on his tour of duty in World War II. He says he remembers it being played at Anzac services around Auckland in the 1950s and has a newspaper photo featuring it. It went missing from the family in the early 60s and it wasn’t until last night that Mr Milne realised it had survived.

Today Seven Sharp reunited an emotional Mr Milne and the bugle at the Auckland Army Centre. Mr Milne believes he still has the original mouth piece that went with the bugle and while he’ll keep that to remember his father by, the Auckland Regiment will keep the bugle so it can continue to be played.


Blake Herbert with bugle talks to Jesse Mulligan


bugle inscription


Ken Davie plays bugle



Ali Mau holds bugle

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Scoop Review Of Books: No Longer An Island

Simon Nathan reviews 'Zealandia: Our Continent Revealed': The idea that New Zealand is part of a large submerged continent is not new... There was renewed interest in the extent of offshore New Zealand from the 1970s onwards with the start of offshore drilling for oil and gas, and this was given impetus by a UN agreement which allowed countries to claim an Extended Continental Shelf (ECS). More>>

Art: Simon Denny Recreates Kim Dotcom’s Personal Effects

Who owns what? How has the internet changed our relation to the world? These are two of the many questions Simon Denny raises in the latest exhibition at the Adam Art Gallery, opening on Saturday 4 October. More>>

Theatre: The F Word: Sex Without The 'ism'

Sex without the 'ism' Okay, so the sexes are equal in the eyes of the law. What the F happens now? More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Don’t Eat The Fish

On 'The Catch' by Michael Field What the ecologically edible lists don’t appear to take into account – and they should – is slavery... It’s not an easy read, but it’s definitely near the top of my listicle of “5 Political Books You Must Read This Year”. More>>

ALSO:

Caracals: Small Cats With Big Ears Arrive At Wellington Zoo

Visitors to Wellington Zoo will be able to see New Zealand’s first Caracals in the Zoo’s new Grassland Cats habitat, with a special visitor opening day on Saturday 27 September. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: Classics - Tales From Moominvalley
Can’t speak for the reading end of it but the Moomins ( or maybe the story about Margaret Wise Brown) were the most enjoyable subject to think about and write about during these whole first 50 issues of Werewolf. For that reason – and because the Moomins always reward re-reading – I’ve decided to reprint it. The only added element is a link to an interesting hour long documentary about Tove Jansson. More>>

ALSO:

Repping In The Pacific: All Blacks And Manu Samoa To Play Historic Apia Test

The All Blacks will play Manu Samoa in Apia on Wednesday 8 July next year as part of both teams’ preparations for Rugby World Cup 2015. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news