Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Mystery of the Gallipoli Bugle Solved


MEDIA RELEASE – 25 APRIL 2013
Seven Sharp

Mystery of the Gallipoli Bugle Solved

The mystery surrounding a World War I bugle played on the battlefields of Gallipoli may have been solved after a viewer recognised it on TVOne’s Seven Sharp last night.

The battered bugle is hand-inscribed with the places it had been and was handed in to the Auckland Regiment by a retired plumber, Paul Winstone. Mr Winstone found it while working under a Grey Lynn house while doing a job in 1963. Over the years he approached the Army Museum in Waiouru and the Auckland War Memorial Museum but neither was interested in it. It wasn’t until he approached the Auckland Army Centre that its significance was recognised.

Regimental Archivist Capt (Rtd) Blake Herbert says finding the bugle was very special. "When Paul contacted the Army Unit in Great North Road it sent chills up the back of my neck. You touch something like that and it's quite ghostly and spooky. To think the bugle has come back home - really just around the corner from where it lay under a house, it's amazing.”

Mr Herbert believes the bugle went to war in the possession of Sgt Sydney Postlewaight and would have been Army issued. It bears the crest of the Auckland Regiment and is hand inscribed with on the bell the ships that carried Sgt Postlewaight to Gallipoli. “It's a taonga.
It's covered in tiny engravings made by pin pricks. It tells a story.” He says the bugle probably survived the battlefields of Gallipoli the Somme and possibly Passchendaele.

Mr Herbert says it’s been a mystery as to how the bugle ended up under a house. However when it was featured on Seven Sharp last night it was recognised by Graham Milne of Hillcrest. Mr Milne believes his father Allen Milne took it on his tour of duty in World War II. He says he remembers it being played at Anzac services around Auckland in the 1950s and has a newspaper photo featuring it. It went missing from the family in the early 60s and it wasn’t until last night that Mr Milne realised it had survived.

Today Seven Sharp reunited an emotional Mr Milne and the bugle at the Auckland Army Centre. Mr Milne believes he still has the original mouth piece that went with the bugle and while he’ll keep that to remember his father by, the Auckland Regiment will keep the bugle so it can continue to be played.


Blake Herbert with bugle talks to Jesse Mulligan


bugle inscription


Ken Davie plays bugle



Ali Mau holds bugle

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Album Review And Rap Beefs: Tame Impala, Currents.

Tame Impala’s new album Currents has one of the hallmarks of an enduring album. At first listen it seems like good, if somewhat ordinary, pop but as you go back more and more layers unravel revealing deeply rich, expertly crafted songs. More>>

Flagging Enthusiasm: Gareth Morgan Announces Winner Of $20k Flag Competition

The winner of the Morgan Foundation’s $20,000 flag competition is “Wā kāinga / Home”, designed by Auckland based Studio Alexander. Economist and philanthropist Gareth Morgan set up the competition because he had strong views on what the flag should represent but he couldn’t draw one himself. More>>

ALSO:

Books: The Lawson Quins Tell Their Incredible Story

They could have been any family of six children – except that five of them were born at once. It will come as a shock to many older New Zealanders to realise that Saturday July 25 is the Lawson quintuplets’ 50th birthday. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Wartime Women

Coinciding as it does with the movie Imitation Game which focusses on Alan Turing breaking the Enigma code in Hut 6 at Bletchley Park (“BP”), this book is likely to attract a wide readership. It deserves to do so, as it illustrates that BP was very much more than Turing and his colleagues. More>>

Maori Language Commission: Te Wiki O Te Reo Māori 2015

The theme for Māori Language Week 27 July – 2 August 2015 is ‘Whāngaihia te Reo ki ngā Mātua’ ‘Nurture the language in parents’. It aims to encourage and support every day Māori language use for parents and caregivers with children” says Acting Chief Executive Tuehu Harris.. More>>

ALSO:

Live Music: Earl Sweatshirt Plays To Sold Out Bodega

The hyped sell-out crowd had already packed themselves as close as they could get to the stage before Earl came on. The smell of weed, sweat and beer filled Bodega – more debauched sauna than bar by this point. When he arrived on stage the screaming ... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news