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New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year 2013

The New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year 2013 Competition Opens Today

FROM A KINGFISHER catching a crab mid-air, to shafts of light breaking through clouds above Glenorchy, the diversity and beauty of New Zealand’s people, places and culture is documented in the New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year competition.

The fifth annual New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year competition opens for entries on May 1.

“The New Zealand Geographic Photogra­pher of the Year celebrates the great diversity of life within the whole New Zealand realm, from the tropics to the pole,” says James Frankham, New Zealand Geographic editor and competition convenor.

“It encourages photographers to critically examine their society and environment and invites the public to look upon our country with new eyes.”

The New Zealand Geographic Photog­rapher of the Year competition is open to amateurs and professionals alike, and has four entry categories; Wildlife, Landscape, Society & Culture, and Photo Story. Photographers can enter any or all of the four categories, but have to do so before 12pm on July 16 this year.

Entrants will vie to be named the New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the 2012

Year, and one entrant (aged under 21 on 30 September 2013) will be named New Zealand Geographic Young Photographer of the Year. All photos must have been taken within New Zealand territory between after January 2012.

Last year more than 3100 entries jostled for the top spots, although Frankham says the finalist and winning images shine through. “With the advent of smartphones, interest in photography has never been higher, and a camera is almost always close at hand. Yet all the same challenges of taking a good photo persist. It’s photographers who can surmount these problems that are rewarded, regardless of whether they’re shooting with a smartphone or digital SLR,” he says.

“If a photographer wants to win a category in this competition, the recipe is pretty simple. Get close to your subject and record an original image that stands apart from the crowd. We reward originality, engagement and connection with the subject, just like anyone who views a picture.”

It is New Zealand’s richest photographic competition with thousands of dollars in cash prizes. This year’s competition builds on previous success. The hugely popular NZ-LIFE exhibition, a collaboration between New Zealand Geographic and Auckland Museum, will tour selected cities across the country this year.

“The fifth year of the New Zealand Geographic Photographer of the Year marks a tide change in the competition. For the first time we’re touring the exhibi­tion across the country, making it as nationally relevant as the magazine itself,” says Frankham.

More than 200,000 people visited the exhibition at Auckland Museum and now the rest of the country can see award-winning images from previous years of the competition, as well as finalist from the 2013 competition, in a city near them.

Keen photographers can find competition details, browse previous winners and enter the competition through the New Zealand Geographic website:

Further competition details are in the May/June 2013 issue of the New Zealand Geographic, on newsstands and in stores Monday 6 May.

David Hallett, Wildlife winner 2012

Enter at


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