Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


World's best surfer goes back to school


World's best surfer goes back to school

Current ASP World Surfing Champion Joel Parkinson swapped his surfboard for books when he visited Barrenjoey High, on Sydney’s northern beaches, as the newest ambassador for the SurfAid Schools Program.

Parkinson, 32, addressed an assembly of enthralled students before joining a classroom group for a SurfAid lesson on geography. ‘Parko’ was the first at his table to find Bali on the map. “I used to love geography – it was my favourite subject,” he said.

Parkinson said he was stoked when SurfAid asked him to be an ambassador. “It's a huge honour, especially for something that does so much good. It was a no-brainer for me to jump on board. I want to raise awareness around the world as much as I can and show the world what SurfAid do."

The SurfAid Schools Program, which is supported by Billabong, is an international education program that aims to develop global citizenship values. It uses the humanitarian challenges and achievements of non-profit organisation SurfAid as an educational example for action.

Pioneered at Barrenjoey High in 2007, the SurfAid Schools program has more than 2,000 schools registered in Australia, New Zealand, the United States, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The schools can access free, online educational material with subjects ranging from health and economics to history and geography.

surfaidschools.org

“One of the best things about the program is the way it engages both teachers and students on important global issues,” SurfAid Schools Program Manager Milton Brown said.

Addressing the students, Brown said: “The real message behind this program is about being a good global citizen, about how you perceive the world, and about what contributions you are going to make to the world as you move forward. That is the choice that you will need to make as individuals.

“It's about making you think about what it means to really help other people in an educated and meaningful sort of way, not in a self-pitying or sad kind of way,” he said.

Brown said it was a privilege to share the stage with Parkinson. “To honour him as world champion first of all, and also to accept him as an ambassador for the SurfAid Schools Program is really a great honour.

“Having one of the most popular and recognisable surfing athletes in your corner only enhances the program’s buy-in and popularity. Joel is a terrific role model for young students and we greatly appreciate his endorsement," Brown said.

Parko said he especially enjoyed the interaction with the students where they asked questions ranging from why it’s important to support SurfAid to who is the most annoying surfer on the ASP World Tour.

“The students’ questions were really refreshing - totally open and honest, no filters,” he said.


ABOUT SURFAID

The mission of SurfAid, a non-profit humanitarian organisation, is to improve the health, wellbeing and self-reliance of people living in isolated regions connected to us through surfing.

SurfAid’s health programs involve education in nutrition, hygiene, healthy environments and disease prevention - including mosquito net distribution.

SurfAid has built an award-winning capacity in emergency preparedness and has delivered five emergency response programs following major disasters, including the Boxing Day 2004 Tsunami and the October 2010 Mentawai tsunami.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Carrie Fisher: Hollywood In-Breeding & The Velocity Of Being - Binoy Kampmark

There was always going to be a good deal of thick drama around Carrie Fisher, by her own confession, a product of Hollywood in-breeding. Her parents, Debbie Reynolds and the crooner Eddie Fisher, provided ample material for the gossip columns in a marriage breakup after Eddie sped away with Elizabeth Taylor. More>>

  • Image: Tracey Nearmy / EPA
  • Gordon Campbell: On The Best Albums Of 2016

    OK, I’m not even going to try and rationalise this surrender to a ‘best of’ listicle. Still…maybe there is an argument for making some semblance of narrative order out of a year that brought us Trump, Brexit and the deaths of Prince, David Bowie, Leonard Cohen and Alan Vega, who I missed just as much as the Big Three. So without further ado….oh, but first a word from the sponsor More>>

    Emojis: World’s First Māori Emoji App Launched

    It’s here - the world’s first Māori emoji app Emotiki has landed just in time for summer roadtrips and santa stockings, with 200 Māori and Kiwi cultural icons for people to share their kiwiana moments with each other and the world. More>>

    Howard Davis: Album Of The Year - Van Morrison's 'Keep Me Singing'

    2016 was a grand year for Van The Man - The Belfast Cowboy turned 71, received a knighthood, and reissued an expanded set of soul-fired live recordings from 1973 ('It's Too Late to Stop Now'). In the game for 53 years now, Morrison's albums consistently open new windows into the heart and soul of one of the most enigmatic figures in modern music. More>>

    Review: The NZSO Performs Handel's Messiah

    Max Rashbrooke: Saturday night's performance took the piece back to something like the way it would have originally been performed when premiered in 1742, with an orchestra of 20-30 players and only a few more singers. More>>

    Culture: Rare Hundertwasser Conservation Posters Found After 40 Years

    When Jan and Arnold Heine put a roll of conservation posters into storage in 1974 they had no idea that 42 years later they would be collectors items. More>>

    Scoop Review Of Books: The Stolen Island: Searching for ‘Ata by Scott Hamilton

    Reviewed by Michael Horowitz
    Located even further south than temperate Noumea, Tonga’s tiny island of ‘Ata might have become the jewel of the kingdom’s burgeoning tourist industry. Imagine a Tongan resort that would not only be mild in winter, but pleasant in summer. More>>

    Scoop Review of Books: Extraordinary Anywhere: Essays On Place From Aotearoa NZ

    The New Zealand landscape undoubtedly is very beautiful, but so is the British one, and my attachment to this country is much more about some particular places, and the memories and emotions that in them combine, than it is about the landscape as a whole. More>>

    Get More From Scoop

     
     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
    Culture
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news