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TrueBliss Launch Dance Challenge for Child Cancer

CCF child
ambassador Kelcey Roberts with Truebliss band members Megan
Alatini and Erikia Takacs, and school children from
Bucklands Beach Intermediate.
CCF child ambassador Kelcey Roberts with Truebliss band members Megan Alatini and Erikia Takacs, and school children from Bucklands Beach Intermediate.


Media Release
Thursday, June 20, 2013

TrueBliss Launch Dance Challenge for Child Cancer

The first TV-created girl band in the world, TrueBliss, reformed in 2012 to write a special song for children with cancer. This year they are back asking kids and dance enthusiasts from around New Zealand to show their support by taking up a new dance challenge.

Child Cancer Foundation (CFF) ambassador Megan Alatini and her TrueBliss band mates, Joe Cotton, Erika Takacs and Keri Harper are fronting the “One Day Dance Challenge” as part of CCF’s One day for Child Cancer Month.

In support of the Child Cancer Foundation, TrueBliss released “A Minute of One Day” in 2012 and have now got together again to inspire kids to choreograph and perform their own dance set to this song. Alatini, who is also a former New Zealand Idol judge will along with her band-mates critique the dances and judge the winning entry.

Alatini and Takacs visited Bucklands Beach Intermediate this week to promote the competition. Also taking part was CCF child ambassador and cancer survivor Kelcey Roberts, (12). Kelcey lives in West Auckland, goes to St Cuthbert’s College in Central Auckland and loves to dance.

To take part visit www.childcancer.org.nz, download the song and get creative. Choreograph your own dance moves with your friends, classmates and colleagues. Once you have registered on the CCF website, video your dance and upload it to the One Day You Tube Channel. The winners will receive an iPod dock and speakers for your school or organisation.

There is also a fundraising initiative wrapped around the dance competition. The team who raises the most funds by getting people to donate in support of their entry through will also win a party pack to the value of $200 for a lunch-time celebration.

The group that wins the Best Dance may also have the opportunity to be part of a music video to be produced for “A Minute of One Day.”

Alatini says the TrueBliss girls are really excited to be supporting One Day for Child Cancer Month again. “It’s all about supporting children with cancer’s hopes and dreams,” she says.

“Children with cancer are on a really tough journey and need their dreams to get through their treatments and cope with all the time they have to spend isolated from their friends.”
If you would prefer do something else to support children with cancer during July, there are loads of others things you can do. “That ‘something’ can be absolutely anything at all. It’s all about having fun and using your imagination,” says Alatini.

This is the second year the Child Cancer Foundation has held “One Day for Child Cancer.” Last year around $100,000 was raised by holding events that ranged from cupcake days to a mid-Winter Christmas feast. This year the Child Cancer Foundation is aiming to raise even more to support the hopes and dreams of children impacted by cancer.

The Foundation aims to reduce the impact of cancer by offering services to ensure children and their families are supported, informed and well cared for on their journey with cancer through treatment and beyond. CCF’s wide ranging support includes support and information from time of diagnosis, groups to connect families, financial assistance through difficult times, camps, access to holiday homes and scholarships.

Three children are diagnosed with cancer each week in New Zealand and collectively undergo a total of 100,000 treatments and procedures annually.


ENDS

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