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Winners of Nikon Auckland Photo Day Competition Announced

“We need to talk” –

Nikon 2013 Auckland Photo Day winner’s take on contemporary life

The winners of the Nikon Auckland Photo Day 2013 competition have been announced. More than 1100 entries were received for the 2013 competition, adding to a unique archive of images of Auckland and its communities created throughout the event’s 10 year history.

2013’s winner is Groo Lee’s image of three people in a living room reading electronic devices, ironically titled We need to Talk. Judges praised the image for its contemporary content and lighting.

Second prize went to Peter Chuah’s engaging photograph, No Fish Today, of a couple outside the Downtown ferry terminal.

Third prize was awarded to Kimber Brown’s Miles Away, an atmospheric image featuring a lone figure in downtown Auckland which judges praised for its minimalism and “spy-like” quality.

As part of his winning prize Mr Lee will receive a brand new Nikon D600 (the lightest and most compact Nikon FX-format DSLR, equipped with superior ISO capability). The second prize winner is rewarded with a Nikon D7100 (with a 24.1 megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor), while the third place getter receives a Nikon COOLPIX A (with a 16.2 megapixel DX-format).

Media release June 20 2013

Winning Auckland images 1/2

2013’s Nikon Auckland Photo Day judges were veteran Auckland photographer, Gil Hanly, Chris Traill, FNZIPP, and Nikon marketing manager, Jeremy Andrews.

The judges were highly impressed by the calibre and diversity of the images submitted.

Nikon marketing manager Jeremy Andrews says Nikon is proud to continue its association with the Auckland Festival of Photography, and to present the Nikon Auckland Photo Day. “Over and above any marketing onus, Nikon’s participation reflects the support of grass roots photography in New Zealand. This inspiring event provides an opportunity for anyone with a camera to be part of documenting Auckland’s cultural fabric for years to come.”

Mr Andrews says the event can provide a catalyst for up and coming photographers, and germinate bigger things, such as 2011’s winner, Mareea Vegas, who has turned a long standing interest into a profession.“This ‘day in the life’ competition continues to reveal Auckland’s diverse people and places. Our city is rich fodder for anyone with a camera. This event is unashamedly Auckland centric – though we are delighted so many out-of-town entrants are lured to the city of rain and sales to participate in the event,” Mr Andrews says.

Auckland Festival of Photography spokesperson Julia Durkin says “This year’s event illustrates the popularity of photography as an accessible form of visual expression, and the value of having a range of photographers’ styles and viewpoints photographing our city and its communities. It is inspiring to see so many people participating in this annual competition. In each of the past two years, the competition has received more than 1000 entries, and the quality and originality just keeps getting better. We now have an archive of more than 9000 images of our changing city, caught every June, over the past decade.”

Media release June 18 2013

Winning Auckland images 2/2

To view 2013’s shortlisted entries – and have your say in the People’s Choice vote - visit www.photographyfestival.org.nz/photo-dom

2013’s images add to a unique time capsule of Auckland photography that, since 2004, has built into an archive of thousands of images. Photo day images have been exhibited during past photography festivals and internationally - including 2012 photographs shown at China’s Pingyao International Festival last September and in Toulouse at MAP in France in 2011. You can view previous winners at www.photographyfestival.org.nz/gallery/

Nikon Auckland Photo Day

The year’s Nikon Auckland Photo Day, held on Saturday 8 June, is one of the highlights of the annual Auckland Festival of Photography, held each June since 2004. Nikon Auckland Photo Day is Auckland’s largest public photography competition, encouraging photographers to capture their city - and the imagination.

Auckland Festival of Photography

The Auckland Festival of Photography is an annual regional contemporary art and cultural event that takesplace each June. Festival exhibitions and events feature in major galleries and project spaces, as well as community and public areas. As well as bringing international photographers, and their work, to Auckland audiences, the free festival showcases works by emerging and established New Zealand artists - and features images that reflect the region’s diverse cultures, communities and identity. Participation and community access are the primary drivers of its free public programme.

Auckland Festival of Photography Trust

The annual festival is produced by the Auckland Festival of Photography Trust. In the past decade, the not for profit charitable trust has grown the festival into a major regional and international event, through imaginative programming that has grown audiences for photography across Auckland.

Asia Pacific Photoforum

The Auckland Festival of Photography Trust is a founding member of the Asia Pacific Photoforum, an organisation enhancing the presence of photography across the Asia Pacific region as a means of artistic expression and dissemination of ideas. The Photoforum is made up of international photography festivals across New Zealand, Australia and Asia.

Statistical snapshots of the annual

Auckland Festival of Photography


Audience visits:

2012: 62,579

2011: 45,199

2010: 35,000

Website:

32,600,000 hits since inception

883,027 page views of Auckland Photo Blog

98,207 page views, 2012, People’s Choice Nikon Auckland Photo Day

312,000 sessions/visits, 2006-2013, average 18 minutes

Visits by country: New Zealand, Australia, UK, India, Germany, France, Netherlands

June 2010 online survey

40% aged less than 35 years

60% aged 35 years or older


28% Auckland Central

21% North Shore

20% Manukau

19% Waitakere

12% outside Auckland

March 2010 online survey

52% male, 48% female

69% tertiary educated

2009 Talking Culture audience research

33% aged 24 years or younger

31% aged 25-44 years

37% aged 45 or older

2005 exhibition visitor survey

56% female, 44% male

82% tertiary educated

37.5% aged 25-34 year

18.75% aged 18-24 years

40% aged 35 years or older

www.photographyfestival.org.nz

ENDS

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