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Walk In Their Shoes for Charity

August 21, 2013

Walk In Their Shoes for Charity

Some of Auckland’s top artists including Otis Frizzell and Billy Apple are trading in their usual canvases for a pair of Nikes in support of the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre (RMTC).

The project, known as ‘Safe in Sound’ sees 10 artists - graphic designers, tattooists and graffiti writers - each painting a unique design on a pair of Nike Air Force 1 trainers. The 10 pairs of shoes will be auctioned off at Britomart’s Fukuko restaurant on August 29 with all the proceeds going to RMTC.

RMTC is a charity that provides music therapy to children and young adults with special needs to assist their growth and development and encourage communication and participation within their immediate and wider communities.

Carol White, Director of RMTC, says she is delighted to see more people from differing creative backgrounds getting involved to support the work RMTC does.

“We see the difference music makes in our client’ s lives every day, so we’re thrilled to have these artists come on board using their creativity and art form to support us and the work we do. We are very grateful to everyone who has helped make Safe in Sound possible, especially One Percent Collective and W1 who have put this project together.”

One Percent Collective is a group dedicated to creating a generosity movement where Kiwis donate one per cent of their income to charity.

Vishal Vasan from One Percent Collective says he is looking forward to seeing people get involved with supporting the Safe in Sound project.

“Safe in Sound not only encourages people to be generous for a good cause, it also gives them an opportunity to check out local artwork and get their hands on a pair of unique designer trainers.”

Aucklanders can admire the footwear now on display until the end of the month at Fukuko on Tyler Street and at the Nike Britomart store.

About the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre
Music therapy assists and supports the growth and development of children and young adults with special needs. It provides a vehicle for communication, participation and interaction and reduces their sense of isolation within their immediate and wider communities

The Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre bases their practice on the internationally-acclaimed Nordoff-Robbins approach emphasising improvisation and other creative techniques. Located in the inner Auckland suburb of Grey Lynn, the centre is the brainchild of a dedicated group of local music industry people, including Hinewehi Mohi and Boh Runga. The centre receives no statutory funding and needs to raise $750,000 this year to keep the Centre running and continue to provide music therapy to over 200 people every month. For more information on the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre go to www.rmtc.org.nz

ENDS

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