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'The Devil Dared Me To' at the Film Archive


Image credit: The Devil Dared Me To (2007).

Listing details: The Devil Dared Me To (2007) film screening
When: 7pm, Thursday through Saturday, 5 - 7 September
Where: The New Zealand Film Archive, 84 Taranaki St, Wellington
Ticket price: $8 general admission / $6 concession

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The Devil Dared Me To at the Film Archive

The Devil Dared Me To (2007) is a feature film made by and starring daredevil New Zealanders Chris Stapp and Matt Heath. Every kiwi lad dreams of greatness. For some it’s as an All Black, for others it’s scaling the highest peaks. But for little Randy Cambell (Stapp), the dream is as big as the stunts his not-so death defying father died attempting.

Young Randy Cambell yearns to be New Zealand’s greatest living stuntman, much to the chagrin of his aunt and uncle, who understand that the petrol running in Randy’s veins is bound to ignite one day. Can the love of a one-legged female Evil Knieval save Randy and break his descendants’ long legacy of fiery and fatal confrontations with the grim reaper?

The filmmakers behind The Devil Dared Me To (2007), Chris Stapp and Matt Heath, are well known for their work on the kiwi stunt show Back Of The Y.

“Inspired idiocy on the big screen from local stunt comedy duo.. [...] It’s crude, rude and boorish. But fortunately its brand of tastelessness makes for the most big dumb fun to roll out of the Made-in-NZ film can in some time.” - New Zealand Herald, 11 October 2007 “The nation that gave us Peter Jackson and Black Sheep is always going to have a place in the heart of horror audiences, and The Devil Dared Me To carries much the same vulgar/potentially offensive brand of humour. If you’re at all amused by fathers who swear profusely in front of their children, sexy female amputees (put to film pre-Planet Terror, we might add), and the obviously dire consequences of ridiculous vehicular stunts, then you’ll find plenty to laugh at. And speaking of the stunts, this team have clearly taken a leaf from the book of their Australian neighbours, as they go the Ozsploitation route of doing as much of the stuntwork themselves as possible, with health, safety and insurance given little regard. And it shows. Chris Stapp in particular pulls off a couple of really hair-raising moves, and knowing that it’s really him doing it does get the viewer that bit more invested."
-brutalashell.com

The Devil Dared Me To will screen at 7pm, Thursday through Saturday, 5 - 7 September.

At the Film Archive, 84 Taranaki St.


ENDS

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