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Movember Builds to a Hairy Conclusion

Movember Builds to a Hairy Conclusion



Navy frigate HMNZS TE MANA sports a number of keen mo-growers, including the Commanding Officer, deploying to conduct counter-piracy operations in the Gulf of Aden

Hear that bristling sound? It is the earnest sound of millions of men’s upper lip follicles straining to produce that final growth for the month of Movember.

While it is still a few days until the conclusion of this year’s hairy efforts, the campaign is looking strong and set to top last year’s growth in both registration numbers and in funds raised for prostate and testicular cancer and male mental health.

New Zealand manager Rob Dunne says the final week is always a critical time for Movember.

“This is when men reach their hairiest and their fundraising efforts really start to peak,” he says.

“But they can sometimes succumb to bristle fatigue and let the pressure from their workmates, partners, girlfriends and wives bring a premature end to the campaign.”

“It is not time to lose stamina – the final push needs all the focus and energy that can be mustered to ensure a spectacular finish,” says Dunne.

Last year Movember achieved more than a million registrations worldwide and raised over $171 million, the 10th year that the organisation has been raising funds.

New Zealand has been taking part for eight years now and every year attracts an eclectic selection of ambassadors and activities.

Among them this year is yachting commentator Martin Tasker who joined the campaign for the first time, having his 41 year old moustache removed by cut-throat razor live on breakfast television.

Also on TVNZ Breakfast, weather man Sam Wallace ignored the guidance of management, growing an impressive handlebar moustache to display live on air each day during the month and raising funds in the process.

The world Forceback Championships were created and held, which featured ex All Black players Aaron Mauger and Steve Devine, to name a few participants.

George FM DJ and Seven Sharp social media presenter Tim Lambourne challenged a potato to see who could grow more hair, faster, and has been offering to perform a ‘a service of any kind’ to the person who donates the most to his Mo-space. The potato is currently winning.

For the first time ever since Victorian times, the Royal New Zealand Navy was given official approval to grow moustaches for the month of Movember, and many did so with great enthusiasm. The crew on frigate HMNZS TE MANA were growing Mo’s en route to their operational deployment in the Gulf of Aden.

Kiwi Chef Ben Bayly of The Grove and Baduzzi has been growing and serving moustache friendly foods and has put up a dinner for up to 10 people, worth $2000, to the person who donates the most to his Movember efforts http://nz.movember.com/mospace/8783017.

And four young men aged 20 - 21 who call themselves ‘Movember Boys vs Wild’ announced they would be walking un-aided, with no accommodation, food or transport provided, from Auckland to Taupo in an effort to raise awareness and funds for men’s health. At this stage they are sitting at about $3000 and look to raise $2000 more.

“These efforts all have an element of fun in them, but they also reflect the value of the message behind Movember,” says Dunne.

“Men aren’t good for taking care of themselves. Movember is all about getting men to start a conversation about their health and taking action to keep themselves well.”

“Again, I urge everybody to get behind those men and women who have registered and to support their efforts for a healthier, hairier community,” he says.

(ends)

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