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2014 Ngāpuhi Festival Goes Global

November 29, 2013

EMBARGOED TILL SUNDAY, DEC 1, 2013

2014 Ngāpuhi Festival Goes Global


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Ria Hall

The biennial Ngāpuhi Festival is launched today announcing a programme that promises to be one of the most spectacular in its 10-year history.

The 2014 Ngāpuhi Festival incorporates one of the country’s most elite art exhibitions and will include works from some of the world’s most sought after artists including Peter Jemison, Lillian Pitt, Sid Dominic and Bindi Waugh.

They will combine with Ngāpuhi and Māoridom’s best like Bob Jahnke, Sandy Adsett, Fred Graham and his son Brett, Darcy Nicholas, Allen Wihongi and Manos Nathan to produce an international exhibition that could rival any exhibition in the world.

The festival is hosted by Te Rūnanga-Ā-Iwi-O-Ngāpuhi and chairman, Rāniera (Sonny) Tau, said the 2014 Ngāpuhi Festival will be the biggest and best ever.

“We are literally, bringing the world to our doorsteps with some of the most recognised faces in the indigenous art community exhibiting at the 2014 Ngāpuhi Festival,” he said.

The Ngāpuhi Festival will showcase Ngāpuhi culture, arts, history and entertainment. The
entertainment line up is the cream of Māori performing artists including the Honour Matariki group (Maisey Rika, Ria Hall, Whirimako Black and Betty-Ann Monga), Paua, Soljah, 1814 and Sons of Zion whose album Universal Love currently sits in the top 20 New Zealand albums on the NZ Music Charts.

Said Mr Tau, “We aim for the best and our people expect the best. Nothing less, and we’ve been fortunate that our sponsors recognise this and have committed to long-term partnerships to celebrate an event that grows from strength to strength.”

The 2014 Ngāpuhi Festival runs from 25-26 January at Northland College, Mangakāhia Rd, Kaikohe.

It is a free, whānau-oriented event with free rides and activities for the children, a kapa haka super 12 competition, talent quest, wananga forums on Ngāpuhi culture and tikanga, over 100 stalls and a mass haka on the last night to close.

“With over 40,000 people coming to the Ngāpuhi Festival there’s wide ranging benefits for everyone,” he said.

ENDS

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