Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


When Rugby Referees Dressed for the Theatre

When Rugby Referees Dressed for the Theatre

January 6, 2014


When rugby internationals were played in the northern hemisphere in the 19th century, the referee wore a suit and bowler hat and waved a white flag.

The New Zealand Rugby Museum in Palmerston North has taken possession of a rare lithograph of a famous rugby painting depicting a forward struggle between England and Scotland about 1876.

The original painting by artists, Overend and Smyth, is missing but fortunately a few early lithographs were made in the 19th century. One was discovered on a Hunterville farm and is now on loan to the New Zealand Rugby Museum.

The lithograph shows an English player in white competing for the ball surrounded by Scottish forwards, one of which appears to be ready to swing his fist.

There’s little flesh visible. All the players have jerseys, long white knickerbockers, socks and boots without studs. The impeccable referee appears to be signalling a train or dressing for the theatre rather than controlling an early rugby test.

A Scottish player, “frozen in time” by the artists, is referred to as Mr Kit, the man who later developed the kitbag, probably first used to carry his rugby gear.

Two mounted police are in the rear in front of hundreds of spectators.

Director of the New Zealand Rugby Museum, Stephen Berg, is delighted to receive the print. He says it fills a gap in the museum’s Roots of Rugby gallery and will be displayed in January for local and national visitors.

Stephen points out that, when the painting was taken to Paris, it’s believed to have caused such interest that several Parisian rugby teams were established shortly afterwards.

The lithograph, which is over a metre in width and close to a metre in height, is one of 2,500 rugby treasures on display at the Palmerston North museum.

Recent acquisitions are All Black rugby jerseys from last season, the blazer from 1953-’64 international, Ian Clarke, and a bright red Welsh jock strap.

The embossed athletic support, made for the British Gas Wales Rugby Football Club, is in mint condition and was donated by former World Cup All Black lock, Murray Pierce, who received it in 1988.

“It’s amazing what weird and strange things we receive for our collection. It’s what makes our museum unique in the world and worth visiting,” Stephen says.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Scoop Review Of Books: The Typewriter Factory

I finished reading Don’t Dream It’s Over not long after it came out last August. I even started writing a review, which took something of an ‘I’m sorry people, but it’s already over’ approach. I’ve been pretty negative about journalism as it’s practiced in the mainstream (or MSM, or corporate media or liberal media or whatever terminology you prefer) for quite some time (see for example Stop the Press), and I believe the current capitalist media model is destructive and can’t be reformed. More>>

Sheep Update: Solo World Shearing Record Broken In Southland

Southland shearer Leon Samuels today set a new World solo eight-hours strongwool ewe-shearing after a tally of 605 in a wool shed north of Gore. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: Dick Frizzell At The Solander Gallery

One of the most influential and celebrated contemporary Pop artists working in New Zealand, Dick Frizzell is mostly known for his appropriation of kitsch Kiwiana icons, which he often incorporates into cartoon-like paintings and lithographs. Not content with adhering to one particular style, he likes to adopt consciously unfashionable styles of painting, in a manner reminiscent of Roy Lichtenstein. More>>

Old Music: Pop Icon Adam Ant Announces NZ Tour

Following his recent sold out North American and UK tours, Adam Ant is celebrating the 35th anniversary of the release of his landmark KINGS OF THE WILD FRONTIER album with a newly-remastered reissue (Sony Legacy) and Australasian tour. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books:
Looking Back

Writing a memoir that appeals to a broad readership is a difficult undertaking. As an experienced communicator, Lloyd Geering keeps the reader’s interest alive through ten chapters (or portholes) giving views of different aspects of his life in 20th-century New Zealand. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Purple (and Violet) Prose

This is the second recent conjoint publication by Reeve and Stapp; all to do with esoteric, arcane and obscure vocabulary – sesquipedalian, anyone – and so much more besides. Before I write further, I must stress that the book is an equal partnership between words and images and that one cannot thrive without the other. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news