Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


The Dreamer: It’s time to meet the monsters under your bed

Media Release

The Dreamer: It’s time to meet the monsters under your bed.

On February 18th – 22nd at Whitireia Theatre, 7:30pm nightly. Tickets: students, concessions and Fringe Artists/Addicts are $12 and adults are $18. Tickets can be purchased through Whitireia website or on our Fringe Eventfinda listing.

This play addresses the subjectivity of reality. A Dreamer is thrown through different states of reality, different times, and different places. As she journeys, she meets a number of characters – a teddy bear, some dragons, her mother, a burglar. Though not chronological, her journey is ultimately one to discover whether she can retain the joy and innocence of her childhood while fighting her mental illness.

Director Emma Robinson of the Loose Screw Collective brings us her debut Fringe piece which aims to push our boundaries and dispel our assumptions of mental illness. Emma finds “artists have an important place in changing the ingrained beliefs of society.” Her fantastical, comedic piece addresses all of our unspoken assumptions to show that reality is not always as it seems.

There are many challenging and compelling elements to this production. It contains original compositions by Armand Gerbault-Gaylor. It fits loosely into the genre of magic realism, and these elements of fantasy are created through shadow play, giant puppetry and UV lights. Using innovative technologies and circus inspired physical stunts, the magical world of the Dreamer is brought to life.

Emma was driven to create this play to challenge ideas about mental illness and recovery. By presenting a main character with a mental illness, this play is showing that it is a common and often hidden thing. In her words: “your best friend, parent or child might be afflicted and you would never know.” The experience of being a sufferer is made relatable and understandable by portraying this dream world inside a character’s head. The Dreamer aims to challenge the belief that mentally ill people are “crazy” or “broken” or “wrong”; Emma wants her audience to know that “we are just like you.

The Dreamer shows how the process of recovery is an ongoing challenge; there is no magic pill or sudden event that fixes someone. However, this journey is a comedic one, because in this play the audience can see the working of the human brain and thus see their own quirks up on stage. The writing is down to earth and relatable, and Emma believes that “we are educating through comedy and through spectacle.”

Finally, Emma has incorporated elements of queer theatre. This is an unconventional story, but it represents the under-represented. It is important to note that the main character’s queerness does not define her and is not a plot point; it is simply there as a facet of her character. This is not a gay story; it is a story about a complex character whose main adversary is mental illness, not societal oppression, who just happens to be gay. It is the kind of representation that the queer community is looking for in mainstream and even underground media.

For more details, to set up a story or to keep in line with the latest updates please feel free to contact the Marketing Manager of the Loose Screw Collective, Amanda Eggers. Get more involved by liking us on Facebook or donating on Pledge Me.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Review: Howard Davis On Olivier Assayas' 'Personal Shopper'

Olivier Assayas’ Personal Shopper is stylish, mysterious, and very strange indeed. It manages to be both ghost story and suspense thriller, yet also a portrait of numbed loneliness and ennui , held together by an peculiarly inexpressive performance from ... More>>

Howard Davis: Never Too Old To Rock & Roll - Jethro Tull

As Greil Marcus recently observed in an NYRB review of Robbie Robertson's autobiographical Testimony, in rock and roll there is always an origin story. In the case of Jethro Tull founder Ian Anderson, he claims to have been influenced by his father's big band and jazz record collections and the emergence of rock music in the 1950s, but became disenchanted with the "show biz" style of early US stars like Elvis Presley... More>>

October: Alice Cooper Returns To NZ

It was March 1977 when Alice Cooper undertook his first ever concert tour of New Zealand – and broke attendance records. 40 years on and this revered entertainer continues to surprise and exude danger at every turn, thrilling audiences globally! More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: The Contemporary Relevance Of Denial

Denial has all the hallmarks of a riveting courtroom drama. Based on a 1996 British libel case that author David Irving brought against Lipstadt, the movie has been criticized as flat and stagey, but it nonetheless conveys a visceral clarity of vision and sense of overwhelming urgency. More>>

Obituary: John Clarke Dies Aged 68

Andrew Little: “I grew up with Fred Dagg and I am devastated by John Clarke’s death. He taught us to laugh at ourselves and more importantly laugh at our politicians.” More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis: Colin McCahon's 'on Going Out With The Tide'

Curated by Wystan Curnow and Robert Leonard, On Going Out with the Tide features major works that have been assembled from public and private collections across New Zealand and Australia. It focusses on McCahon’s evolving engagement with Māori subjects and themes, ranging from early treatments of koru imagery to later history paintings which refer to Māori prophets and investigate land-rights issues. More>>

Howard Davis: Rodger Fox Gets Out The Funk

By now a living New Zealand legend, band leader and trombonist Rodger Fox has performed with some of the biggest names in the jazz business, including Louie Bellson, Bill Reichenbach, Chuck Findley, Randy Crawford, Bobby Shew, Lanny Morgan, Bruce Paulson, Diane Schuur, Arturo Sandoval, David Clayton-Thomas, and Joe Williams, to name only a few. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news