Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


Superbike racer speeds through pain barrier

Media release from Motorcycling New Zealand

Friday 10 January

Superbike racer speeds through pain barrier

Sloan Frost has to race through the pain barrier to stake his claim in the New Zealand Superbike Championship at Timaru this weekend.

The Wellington racer started the season as one of the favourites for the title but a heavy crash at Wanganui on Boxing Day left him with a battered Suzuki and minor but painful injuries to his right wrist and a heel.

Suzuki New Zealand gave him a new bike to use for spare parts but the human body is not so easy to fix and Frost was off his usual pace in the first round of the championship, the New Zealand Grand Prix meeting at the Ruapuna circuit in Christchurch last weekend, where he finished fourth overall.

“The biggest problem I suffered all weekend was the pain and lack of movement through my wrist on the right hand corners,” he said. “As the race would go on it would get worse and I would slowly lose all the strength in my arm so my fine motor controls on the throttle were terrible.”

The pain continues, and Frost does not take pain-killers because he finds they have a dulling effect on him. But he is feeling strong and more confident, having proved last weekend that he could go pretty fast despite his handicap in this highly competitive championship.

“I feel like I can race this weekend,” he said. “I’m definitely here to race, not just to collect points.”

Christchurch rider Dennis Charlett, 45, leads the championship after racing his Suzuki to victory in all three races at the GP meeting. If he can maintain that form he will clearly be hard to beat.

Hard-charging Nick Cole from Hamilton, who won the international Suzuki Series in December, finished second each time at Ruapuna on his Kawasaki and he will be fired up to cut back Charlett’s points lead.

But the standard of New Zealand motorcycle racing is now so high that there is a host of fast riders capable of challenging for the top placings.

These include Suzuki riders Hayden Fitzgerald (New Plymouth), Scott Moir (Taupo), Craig Shirriffs (Feilding) and Ray Clee (Kumeu) and the Honda team of Tony Rees (Whakatane) and James Smith (Christchurch), while Australian Linden Magee has shown strong form on his BMW.

In 600cc Supersport, reigning champion John Ross of Christchurch leads the series but fellow Cantabrian Alastair Hoogenboezem, also on a Suzuki, pushed him very hard at Ruapuna and Seth Devereux (Christchurch) won a race on his Kawasaki. Other leading riders in this class include Taupo’s Toby Summers on a Yamaha.

Other championship classes are Superlite, Pro Twin, 250 Production, 125 GP and 250 Mono (which race together), and Sidecars. Each class has qualifying and one race on Saturday, and then two races on Sunday.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news