Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Looking not the same as seeing: Why Kiwis are bicycle-blind

Looking is not the same as seeing: Why Kiwis are bicycle-blind

Ask just about anyone. We all have a story to tell about the time we were driving, and “Just didn’t see him”, whether the situation involved another driver, pedestrian, cyclist, or motorcyclist. This is because looking is not the same as seeing, and no one is immune to inattentional blindness. Drivers often fail to notice unexpected events, even ones that are important. Critically though, we assume that we will notice- as long as we are looking in the right direction. We think that unexpected objects and events will “grab” our attention. We consider ourselves careful drivers, and that of course we would see a cyclist because a cyclist would just “pop out” into view. However human attention does not function in this way.

Cognitive psychologists refer to this phenomenon as the ‘illusion of attention’. People don’t see the cyclist because they aren’t looking for the cyclist. Why are Kiwis bicycle-blind? New Zealand is not a transport-by-bicycle culture, unlike many European countries such as Germany and the Netherlands where visually, bicycles outnumber cars. Most New Zealand motor vehicles drivers’ brains are not intentionally malicious, or careless towards cyclists, they just don’t see them. The Transport Agency’s latest advertising campaign attempts to “humanise” and “personalise” the cyclist, as if she was a separate category of the community. She isn’t. She most likely has a car too.

This is because New Zealand drivers are simply not exposed to cyclists frequently, consistently, and en masse. For example, if you are trying to make a difficult turn across traffic, most of the vehicles blocking your path are cars, not bicycles (or motorcycles). To some extent then, bicycles are unexpected.

How can we fix this? Bicycle safety advocates propose a number of solutions: Billboards and signs that implore people to “Look for bicycles!” may in the short term, lead drivers to adjust their expectations, and become more likely to notice a bicycle appear soon after seeing the sign. Yet after several minutes of not seeing any cyclists, their visual expectations will reset, leading them again to expect what they see most commonly- vehicles.

Encouraging cyclists to kit themselves out in high visibility gear does not address the core problem: Motor vehicle drivers not seeing cyclists is caused by what psychologists term ‘inattentional blindness’. Wearing high visibility gear will increase your visibility, for people who are looking for you to see you. Drivers fail to see cyclists precisely because they stand out. Reflective clothing helps increase visibility for cyclists, but it doesn’t override the brain’s expectations for what it thinks it is going to see.

There is one proven way to eliminate inattention blindness: Make the unexpected object or event less unexpected. Only when people regularly look for and expect cyclists will they be more likely to notice and respond. The only way to create this expectation is to have more cyclists around -which requires providing safe and designated off-road cycle paths for cyclists. The only way to make cycling safer is to make it less novel to the human brain.

Serafin Dillon

Cyclist & motor vehicle driver

Source: The research described above has been adapted from the book The invisible gorilla and other ways our intuition deceives us (2011) by Professor Christopher Chabris and Professor Daniel Simons http://www.theinvisiblegorilla.com/

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Werewolf: Katniss Joins The News Team

From the outset, the Hunger Games series has dwelt obsessively on the ways that media images infiltrate our public and personal lives... From that grim starting point, Mockingjay Part One takes the process a few stages further. There is very little of the film that does not involve the characters (a) being on screens (b) making propaganda footage to be screened and (c) reacting to what other characters have been doing on screens. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Ko Witi Te Kaituhituhi

Witi Ihimaera, the distinguished Māori author and the first Māori to publish a book of short stories and a novel, has adopted a new genre with his latest book. But despite its subtitle, this book is a great deal more than a memoir of childhood. More>>

Werewolf: Rescuing Paul Robeson

Would it be any harder these days, for the US government to destroy the career of a famous American entertainer and disappear them from history – purely because of their political beliefs? You would hope so. In 1940, Paul Robeson – a gifted black athlete, singer, film star, Shakespearean actor and orator – was one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. More>>

ALSO:

"Not A Competition... A Quest": Chapman Tripp Theatre Award Winners

Big winners on the night were Equivocation (Promising Newcomer, Best Costume, Best Director and Production of the Year), Kiss the Fish (Best Music Composition, Outstanding New NZ Play and Best Supporting Actress), and Watch (Best Set, Best Sound Design and Outstanding Performance). More>>

ALSO:

Film Awards: The Dark Horse Scores Big

An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach Genesis Potini, made all the right moves to take out top honours along with five other awards at the Rialto Channel New Zealand Film Awards - nicknamed The Moas. More>>

ALSO:

Theatre: Ralph McCubbin Howell Wins 2014 Bruce Mason Award

The Bruce Mason Playwriting Award was presented to Ralph McCubbin Howell at the Playmarket Accolades in Wellington on 23 November 2014. More>>

ALSO:

One Good Tern: Fairy Tern Crowned NZ Seabird Of The Year

The fairy tern and the Fiji petrel traded the lead in the poll several times. But a late surge saw it come out on top with 1882 votes. The Fiji petrel won 1801 votes, and 563 people voted for the little blue penguin. More>>

Music Awards: Lorde Reigns Supreme

Following a hugely successful year locally and internationally, Lorde has done it again taking out no less than six Tuis at the 49th annual Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news