Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Big-name bands to headline Big Day Dowse 2014

Big-name bands to headline Big Day Dowse 2014

Trinity Roots, Electric Wire Hustle, Newtown Rocksteady and The Troubles have been announced as the bands headlining this year’s Big Day Dowse.

The annual party in Dowse Square sees people from around the Wellington Region flood to The Dowse Art Museum for a day of music, performances, visual arts, activities for kids and all-round good times.

The FREE event, which is super family-friendly, will run from 12noon and 6pm on Sunday 23 March 2014. We’re expecting a crowd of about 8,000.

Between the music acts in the Square The Wellington Circus Trust and The Wellington Youth Circus will perform acts of amazement. Their circus flash mob will be appearing in the crowds while their experts teach circus workshops for anyone wanting to learn hula hooping, rollabolla or juggling.

Amongst the family activities in the chill out area you’ll find the Wellington Sea Shanty Society and Anna Bailey from String Bean Puppets.

Still need a reason to mark Big Day Dowse in your calendar? Try the interactive digital installation Acute Self by Interrupt Collective, Tape Art, The Amazing Travelling Photobooth, Empress Stilt Dance butterfly, Lollipop face painting, clay sculpture making, a bouncy castle, craft activities, the best food stalls and heaps of grassy space for picnics.

On the day The Dowse will be showing Peter Robinson, Tribe Sub-tribe, Everyday Fiction (curated by Emma Ng, 2014 Blumhardt/Creative New Zealand Curatorial Intern) and See like your Hero (featuring some Dowse superstars).

Big Day Dowse
FREE
Sunday 23 March 2014
12noon – 6pm
Dowse Square, Laings Road, Lower Hutt
www.thedowse.org.nz

The Valley Flyer bus (no. 91) runs to Queensgate, a two minute walk from The Dowse. Trains run to Waterloo Station, which is a 20 minute walk from The Dowse.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Review: The Magic Flute - Magic Moments

Max Rashbrooke: Mozart’s The Magic Flute is an extraordinary tale, blending a story of great solemnity, of elegant music and Masonic virtue overcoming hatred and discord, with elements of extreme silliness and pure fantasy. .. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: ‘Lovely Swans Of Art’

On Cillia McQueen's 'In a Slant Light': Diary-keeping forms the basis of much of this memoir – as with earlier poems – and we are led gracefully through the waves of her life as she sails through both rough and smooth waters. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news