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The Adults Meet APO: Immovable force vs irresistible power

The Adults Meet the APO: Immovable force vs irresistible power


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The immovable force of rock meets the irresistible power of a symphony orchestra on 30 January, when Kiwi supergroup The Adults join Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra (APO) for a one-off concert at Auckland’s Aotea Centre.

Led by Shihad frontman Jon Toogood and featuring core members Julia Deans (Fur Patrol) and alternative music legend Shayne Carter (DoubleHappys, Straitjacket Fits, Dimmer), The Adults boast some of New Zealand’s most influential musicians.

They are joined by two special guests, who take a song each: four-time New Zealand Music Awards winner Anika Moa and top urban artist Ladi6, whose 2011 album, The Liberation Of…, claimed the Taite Music Prize for New Zealand album of the year.

The worlds of rock and classical are bridged by The Adults’ drummer, Steve Bremner, who APO audiences will recognise from his regular work as an orchestral percussionist.

“I think it’ll be really cool for people who don’t usually come to the orchestra to hear The Adults perform with a full-on symphony orchestra,” says Annabella Zilber, the APO’s Associate Principal Double Bassist. “I think we’re the most powerful band out there in terms of sound production.”

The music comes from The Adults’ hit self-titled album, arranged for band and full orchestra. Renowned conductor Hamish McKeich takes the podium.

“Hamish is a very talented man,” says Jon Toogood, “and watching him communicate with that many people is an education.

“The sound of a full orchestra is just breathtaking. It’s as big as Motörhead.”

WHO: The Adults and Auckland Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Hamish McKeich.
WHERE: Aotea Centre, Auckland
WHEN: 8pm, Thursday 30 January
BOOKINGS: ticketmaster.co.nz, 0800 111 999
MORE:
-       Watch a video clip of Julia Deans talking about performing with the APO here.
-       Watch a video clip of APO double bassist Annabella Zilber talking about performing with The Adults here.
-       The orchestral arrangements for The Adults Meet the APO were made by Steven Small, Claire Cowan, Hamish Oliver and Steve Bremner.

ENDS

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