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Luke Hanna, photo by

Jason Wright



eye is Luke Hanna’s debut choreographic work, which will premier at the Wellington Fringe Festival in February 2014. Luke and his sister, Fran Olds, form the Brothers and Sisters Collective. They will team up with sound artist Jason Wright to explore the world of eye.

Since graduating New Zealand School of Dance in 2006 Luke has toured Europe, USA and Australia with internationally acclaimed dance companies including Black Grace, Australian Dance Theatre and Dance North. However Luke has “always wanted to create a piece”.

The world and journey that Luke seeks to explore in eye was provoked by his experiences whilst dancing in Brussels in 2013. Luke says, “while I was overseas something inside started to click, and an image... started to birth this work. Since then it had its own life, and I was trying to keep up with it.” eye is a solo piece of dance theatre that follows the journey of a man as he navigates himself through a world where growth, perception and identity are key players.

On working with her brother Fran says “we are able to support and challenge each other in a way that is unique to family”. For Luke this collaboration is about the meeting of skills and experiences “she is into drama and writing, I obviously have a movement background, she can put into words things I think about or create that is exactly what I want to get across.”

Brothers and Sisters is passionate about engaging the community in live arts, and it is for this reason that this show will be put on for koha at the Old Hall Wesley Taranaki Street Church. Luke hopes that “they (the audience) will come away feeling like they have been on a journey, possibly a little shocked, but maybe an understanding on where live performance can go.” Brothers and Sisters have received funding from the Emerging Arts Trust and Creative New Zealand, without which this show would not have been possible.

eye premiers on the 13th and 14th of February 7.30pm at the Old Hall Wesley Taranaki Street Church, 75 Taranaki Street, Wellington. The audience is invited to enter the world of eye and embark upon an intimate experience.

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