Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Investment in local music paying off

Media Release

17 January 2014

Investment in local music paying off

Latest results from the two year old NZ On Air Making Tracks music funding scheme show that local music is finding bigger audiences across a diverse range of media.

A review of what happened to completed songs and videos funded in the 2012-2013 financial year shows widespread audience use. As at 31 August 2013, Making Tracks songs and videos were played on radio, on music television and online 8.8 million times, with streaming accounting for 8.7 million of that figure.

Based on initial trends NZ On Air expects those songs to be played at least as many times again in the coming year.

Across the two years of the Making Tracks scheme 330 different artists or groups received funding support. Of those 167 or 51% were new artists, meaning “first time funded”.

Two of the most-played Making Tracks songs of the 2012-13 year are from Portland-based New Zealander Ruban Nielson and his alt-pop band Unknown Mortal Orchestra, which has a growing following in the US as well as in New Zealand.

They take 1st and 3rd in the rankings of the total number of times their songs Swim & Sleep (Like A Shark)and From The Sun have been played on radio, on music television and streamed on YouTube, Vimeo and Spotify.

However when cumulative audiences for radio stations and music television channels are added in, the song that was heard by the most people in that period was Stan Walker’s Take It Easy, followed by Aaradhna’s Lorena Bobbitt.

“If we view the funding of these tracks like an investment, we’ve had a greater return on investment in the past year, as the average number of plays and views per song has increased,” said NZ On Air Music Manager Brendan Smyth.

“Changes to music funding introduced by the Making Tracks scheme are clearly improving outcomes. We are finding and funding a greater diversity of good songs. Audiences, particularly online, are growing. NZ On Air is taking a proactive approach to ensuring the songs we fund are available wherever audiences are,” said Mr Smyth.

In the coming year NZ On Air will be doing more work on increasing New Zealand music consumption via online streaming platforms and promotion to ensure audiences are better able to find and hear the music of their taste. In the meantime, artists can find some useful tips on how to promote their music on the website at www.nzonair.govt.nz/music

The Making Tracks Two-Year Outcomes Review report is available here.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Max Rashbrooke: Review - The NZSO And Nature

This was a lovely, varied concert with an obvious theme based on the natural world. It kicked off with Mendelssohn's sparkling Hebrides Overture, which had a wonderfully taut spring right from the start, and great colour from the woodwinds, especially the clarinets. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: Q&A: Prue Hyman On ‘Hopes Dashed?’

For Scoop Review of Books, Alison McCulloch interviewed Prue Hyman about her new book, part of the BWB Texts series, Hopes Dashed? The Economics of Gender Inequality More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Chuck Berry (And James Comey, And Bill English)

Back when many people were still treating rock’n’roll as a passing fad – was calypso going to be the new thing? – Chuck Berry knew that it had changed popular music forever. What is even more astonishing is that this 30-ish black r&b musician from a middle class family in St Louis could manage to recreate the world of white teenagers, at a time when the very notion of a “teenager” had just been invented. More>>

Howard Davis Review:
The Baroque Fusion Of L'arpeggiata

Named after a toccata by German composer Girolamo Kapsberger, L'Arpeggiata produces its unmistakable sonority mainly from the resonance of plucked strings, creating a tightly-woven acoustic texture that is both idiosyncratic and immediately identifiable. Director Christina Pluhar engenders this distinctive tonality associated with the ensemble she founded in 2000 by inviting musicians and vocalists from around the world to collaborate on specific projects illuminated by her musicological research. More>>

African Masks And Sculpture: Attic Discovery On Display At Expressions Whirinaki

Ranging from masks studded with nails and shards of glass to statues laden with magical metal, the works are from ethnic groups in nine countries ranging from Ivory Coast to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news