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Lightning strikes at Open Day

They say lightning never strikes in the same place twice, but CPIT will soon prove them wrong.

A ‘lightning machine’ which produces 1 million volt bolts is just one of the many attractions the public is invited to view at CPIT’s Community Open Day on January 25th.

CPIT’s electrical trades department houses the amazing Tesla coil. Electrical technician John Marks says the machine takes ordinary 230 volts and, through transformers and a purpose built capacitor, produces powerful 1 million volt lightning bolts.

“It’s a pretty neat machine and we’re lucky to have one here at CPIT.”

Marks says the Tesla coil also produces an electrical charge into the air, which is strong enough to automatically light up fluorescent tubes in the surrounding area.

The Tesla coil will be powered-up on Open Day under CPIT supervision, so that interested members of the public can see the lightning bolts for themselves and hold a light bulb in the vicinity.

CPIT’s Community Open Day is designed for the public to be able to explore CPIT’s facilities, meet with tutors and learn more about studying at CPIT, whilst enjoying the fun activities and entertainment on display.

For those still considering study options for 2014, the Open Day is a chance to discover the more than 150 study options at CPIT, while for those who are already enrolled it is a great opportunity for students to familiarise themselves with CPIT before they begin study.

As well as the lightning bolt at the Trades Innovation Institute, activities on the day at our Madras St campus will include a ‘Master the Pasta’ course, where participants learn to roll, cut, cook then eat delicious fresh fettuccine, a chemistry demonstration, a Latin drumming experience and a performance by popular street artist MulletMan.

At CPIT’s Trades Innovation Institute on Sullivan Ave, the public can compete in a pit stop challenge, where they see how fast they can change a tyre in an automotive workshop, craft their own picture frames and bottle openers, or improve their aim with the electric coil gun.

Younger members of the crowd will be entertained by pony rides, face painting and a bouncy castle.

Community Open Day will run from 11am until 2pm on January 25th 2014 at CPIT’s Madras St Campus and at our Trade Innovation Institute on Ensors Rd. For more information visit: www.cpit.ac.nz/explore-cpit/open-days


Caption: Electrical technician John Marks says the lightning machine’ at CPIT's Open Day this Saturday takes ordinary 230 volts and, through transformers and a purpose built capacitor, produces powerful 1 million volt lightning bolts.

ENDS

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