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‘SING FOR THE CITY’ says the Christchurch City Choir

Tuesday 28 January 2014

2014 has been designated as the year of new beginnings for the Christchurch City Choir and membership growth is top of the agenda.

New music director, Andrew Withington, sees expansion as a vital step in providing an entertaining and relevant choral programme for the future, and is inviting singers of all ages and denominations to join the current Choir to sing for the city.

“The Christchurch City Choir has an important role to play in the life and fabric of the city and my goal is to present a vibrant and varied programme which will inspire and excite a range of audiences, both our loyal supporters and those with whom we have not yet connected” says the music director. “We need the flexibility of a larger choir to achieve this.”

With more than 80 members, the Christchurch City Choir is already the largest symphonic choir in Canterbury, and Andrew hopes to double this over the next year, with a mid-year goal of 120+ members.

“It’s a great opportunity for anyone who can sing and read music to participate in an established symphonic choir, developing their musical skills and gaining exposure to many different choral works. I would strongly encourage anyone who is interested in singing to give it a go - the rewards are huge,” says Andrew.

In addition to the traditional repertoire for which the Choir is well-known, Andrew is also keen to include more contemporary and New Zealand works in the annual programme, building on the reputation and range established by former music director Brian Law, who retired in December 2013 after 22 years at the helm.

Formally established in 1991 with the merger of two long-standing choirs, the Christchurch City Choir continues a proud history of service to the community dating back 125 years, playing a significant role in the musical, economic and cultural life of the city.

It has performed large-scale classical works with the both the New Zealand and Christchurch Symphony Orchestras, participated in civic events such as Classical Sparks, and regularly collaborates with other musicians, including Woolston Brass, local kapa haka groups and Christchurch schools.

Choir rehearsals are held each Tuesday from 7.30pm to 9.45pm, with additional rehearsals prior to a performance.

‘Sing for the City’ auditions of 15 minute duration are being held on several dates in February:

Saturday 1 February: 4.30pm – 6.30pm
Monday 10 February: 7.30pm – 9pm
Thursday 13 February: 8pm – 10pm
Sunday 16 February: 1pm – 5pm

Details on how to request an audition can be found on the Christchurch City Choir website, along with more information on the choir, music director and repertoire.


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