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Search continues for missing girl

Janice Finn presents
Girl in tan boots
Written by Tahli Corin

“…sharply written by award-winner Tahli Corin, the play is fast-paced and laced with dark humour.’ Time Out (AUS)

Be part of the action this March as the hunt for missing girl Hannah Louise Day begins with the New Zealand première of Girl In Tan Boots, from the 11th to the 22nd of March atThe Basement Theatre.

Blurring the lines between what is real and what is imagined, Girl In Tan Boots is a contemporary urban mystery play which proves that secrets and lies can’t be buried for long.

Hannah is missing, and the detective tasked with finding her soon discovers that the circumstances surrounding her disappearance are not as simple as they first appear.

Described as shy, overweight, and lacking in self-confidence, Hannah feels invisible – and now she has disappeared completely. Does it have something to do with her mysterious admirer? Or is it something more sinister? Time is fast running out for a good outcome and Detective Carapetis, along with Hannah’s family and friends, is losing hope.

After an incredibly successful season at Sydney’s Griffin Theatre, Janice Finn (Agent Anna, The Strip) will bring this work to New Zealand for the first time, with a freshly revised version for the NZ stage by playwright, award-winning young Australian Tahli Corin. Corin, creator of the Adelaide Fringe Festival 2008 work Conclusions: On Ice andBumming With Jane, is excited to have her work playing internationally - “It’s a real privilege as a playwright to see your work find new audiences .This is the first time my work has been seen in New Zealand, and I hope it won’t be the last.” says Corin.

The production marks a return to Auckland theatres for television veteran Finn, directing an impressive all-female ensemble including Catherine Wilkin (Outrageous Fortune, McLeod’s Daughters), JJ Fong (Go Girls, StepDave), Toni Potter (Shortland St, In The Next Room), Jodie Hillock (Nothing Trivial, After Miss Julie), Anoushka Klaus(Shortland St, Nothing Trivial), and Catherine Downes (Shortcut to Happiness), with costumes by Liz Mitchell.

“…original, tight, multi-layered, entertaining, thought provoking…Sydney Arts Guide

ENDS

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