Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


OceanWeave Works Alongside Development in Paihia

Alongside Bar is a new development created beside 35 Degrees South, an Aquarium Restaurant and Bar in New Zealand’s Bay of Islands. The multimillion dollar project has seen the addition of a beautiful outdoor waterfront bar featuring luxurious outdoor lounge and dining furniture.

35 Degrees South comes complete with stunning views, situated right on the waterfront in Paihia. The restaurant emphasises their water location with a seafood focussed menu and its grand centrepiece - a 60,000 litre salt water aquarium filled with local fish from the Bay of Islands. To complement this unique indoor restaurant, Alongside was developed as an outdoor bar focussing on a classy but casual social theme. Enhanced with striking outdoor lounge furniture, an extensive beverage list and a bar menu primed for sharing, Alongside is designed to be a relaxing experience for all.

OceanWeave Furniture in Auckland were approached to supply a variety of rattan outdoor furniture to seat around 200 people. All of OceanWeave’s furniture is specifically made to endure warm climates and coastal conditions, making it the ideal solution for this development. Alongside was supplied with 222 pieces of rattan furniture including the Alps Modular Range, Shell Day Bed and Laiva Dining furniture. Shade7, a New Zealand shade specialist who owns the OceanWeave Furniture brand also supplied 8 outdoor umbrellas including their popular Riviera Cantilever and Bistro Market Umbrellas, offering sun protection while also acting as an eye catching feature.

Paihia is a popular holiday destination for both New Zealanders and foreigners, including those arriving by cruise ships to Paihia. The Northland region boasts moderate temperatures making it the ideal place for a year round outdoor bar location. Alongside has already been a great success and has been well received by the local community.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

On Shoestrings And Phones: Rossellini And Contemporary Film

Howard Davis: Roberto Rossellini's Neo-Realist Rome, Open City provides some fascinating technical parallels to Tangerine, an equally revolutionary Independent movie made exactly seventy years later. More>>

Art Review: Fiona Pardington's A Beautiful Hesitation

An aroma of death and decay perfumes this extraordinary survey of Fiona Pardington's work with faint forensic scents of camphor and formaldehyde. Eight large-format still-lifes dominate the main room, while other works reveal progressive developments in style and subject-matter. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news