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Ian Scott: Works from the Wallace Arts Trust Collection 1966

MEDIA RELEASE 31 February 2014 – for immediate release

The Wallace Arts Trust is delighted to announce the opening of the upcoming exhibition at the Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre

Ian Scott: Works from the Wallace Arts Trust Collection 1966-1998

4 February 2013 – 6 April 2014

Opening Monday 4 February, 6 to 8pm
(this is a public event)


Click for big version.

Ian Scott, Air Disaster 0ver Mt. Sefton (1967), oil, acrylic and silkscreen on panel, Collection of the Wallace Arts Trust

Sir James Wallace and the Wallace Arts Trust would like to extend an invitation to all to attend the opening event for an important survey exhibition of works from the Wallace Arts Trust Collection by the late Ian Scott, on Monday 3 February, 6pm at The Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre. Ian Scott: Works from the Wallace Arts Trust Collection 1966-1998 will be exhibited from 4 February until 6 April 2014.

“I first became aware of Ian Scott’s work in the late 1960s and from the beginning was impressed by his fresh and challenging exploration of subjects and styles, especially figurative and abstract and his new way of looking at iconic New Zealand landscapes and putting figures into those landscapes. I was also interested in the way he often openly referenced other artists, both local and overseas. I know of no other artist who successfully, in effect, alternated between hard edged abstract works and ultra-realistic paintings of figures.

From the 1970s I was able to start acquiring works which I continued to do so, albeit sporadically, through to the ‘90s. During all these years I found him a stimulating friend.

This lead to a watershed deal with him in 1998 whereby I was able to fill in the gaps in our Collection in terms of his development and stylistic periods. These purchases included important lattice works, works from the sign-writing and other series and major figurative works. In August of that year we had an Exhibition of those recent acquisitions in our then Gallery at 305 Queen Street (now part of the Q Theatre.) At the opening of that Exhibition Warwick Brown’s then definitive book, Ian Scott Marsden Press (1998), was ‘launched’. 

Few paintings have been added to the Collection after that point, partly because of the diversion of funds to other new artists but mainly because  I considered that we had a very good range of his works while his later career, on the whole, encompassed variations on or a revisiting of his earlier periods. We are however missing examples of some later series, which sadly, because of Ian’s premature death, will have to be filled from the secondary market.”

–Sir James Wallace 2014

Ian Scott (1945–2013) is without doubt one of New Zealand’s most significant artists. Since his emergence on the scene in the late 1960s, his paintings have been widely exhibited and collected throughout New Zealand, with each of the nation’s public collections holding examples of his work.

Between the late 1980s and 1990s the Wallace Arts Trust acquired a wide-ranging collection of 27 works by the artist, a number of which are among his most important. Works such as New Zealand Triptych (1966) and Air Disaster over Mt. Sefton (1967) date from the artist's third and final year at the University of Auckland’s Elam School of Fine Arts, where he studied under Colin McCahon and Garth Tapper. Sky Steps (1969) is illuminating in its relation to two of Scott's most well-known works: Sky Dash (1969-70) in the Auckland Art Gallery Collection, and Leapaway Girl (1969) which was acquired by the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa in 1971 when Scott was only 26. It was this series — typically known as the 'Girlie Series', (and called 'New Realist' paintings by Scott) — that first brought attention to his paintings, including that of the two leading art dealers in the country, Peter McLeavey and Barry Lett, who would exhibit Scott's work over the following years in Wellington and Auckland respectively.

The Wallace Arts Trust holds many of Scott’s key works from the period between the late 80s and 2000s, such as Hairdresser & Tobacconist (1988) and two major works — Rita Angus in Taradale (1987) and Authentic Traditions (1990).

The Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre is located at 72 Hillsborough Road, Hillsborough, Auckland. The Art Centre’s opening hours are Tuesday – Friday 10am till 3pm, Saturday - Sunday 10am till 5pm. Entry is by donation.

For more information please visit www.tsbbankwallaceartscentre.org.nz

ENDS

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