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'How to Universe' premieres in Wellington

'How to Universe' premieres in Wellington

A duo dubbed “The Flight of the Conchords of Juggling” has joined forces with one of the country’s most talented young aerial artists’ to produce a captivating and unique debut performance for Wellington Fringe 2014.

The trio, jugglers Zane and Degge Jarvie and aerialist Imogen Stone, combine their skills and passion for juggling, illusion and physical performance to create their own circus show – ‘How to Universe’.

The show centres around three young performers who come across a book called 'How to Universe' – the one book you must read if you're planning to create your own universe. What follows is a bizarre, hilarious and exhilarating journey into the world of modern circus.

“This super physical & highly entertaining performance includes everything from an aerial hoop and juggling clubs to ping pong balls, and a leaf blower,” Zane.

“It’s is a little bit bizarre, a little bit silly and a lot of fun. We have had a fantastic experience putting the show together.” Zane and Degge are no strangers to the spotlight, having featured as finalists on New Zealand’s Got Talent in 2012. They have earned a reputation as two of the best jugglers in the country.

They enjoy bringing humour into their highly skilled juggling and have been labelled “The Flight of the Conchords of Juggling” by internationally renowned juggler, Matt Hall.

You might say that we were born into juggling,” says Zane.

“We have been juggling longer than I can remember - I blame it on my parents.”laughs Zane.

Imogen Stone has been involved in performance arts from a young age and is known for her musicality and physicality. While still at school, she performed professionally for corporate events from Auckland to Dunedin, until an invitation to tour with Circus Aotearoa along with Zane tempted her to run away and join the circus in December 2012.

“Touring with a Big Top circus was a lifetime experience, truly unforgettable.” says Imogen. “Creating our own show 'How to Universe' for Wellington is just as exciting.”

'How to Universe' premieres as part of Wellington Fringe 2014. Three performers, three imaginations and one book. Anything could happen.

Ends


Location:
The Wellington Circus Trust – Te Whaea
11 Hutchison Rd
Newtown

Tickets From:
www.fringe.co.nz


Ticket prices:
$26 General Admission
$22 Concession
$22 Group

Dates:
Friday 7th February 9pm
Saturday 8th February 9pm
Sunday 9th February 9pm

For More Information Contact:

Zane Jarvie
zaneanddegge@hotmail.co.nz
02102363028

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