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NZ Antique & Classic Boat Show results

NZ Antique & Classic Boat Show results

Lake Rotoiti, Nelson Lakes National Park, - It was a victory for blokeish escapism at this year’s NZ Antique & Classic Boat Show, held at Lake Rotoiti in the Nelson Lakes National Park over the weekend of February 8 & 9 2014.

Over 120 clinkers, steam launches, classic motorboats and sailing dinghies enjoyed two days of boating and chatting about boats, with the Jens Hansen trophy for best vessel overall going to the Christchurch-owned shallow-beam skiff, Willow.

Judges’ spokesman John Harris said this 16’ 7’’ plywood skiff stood out as unique: “The owner, Darryl Maffey, bought her from an elderly man last year and has done her up as a ‘blokes boat’, finished simply in grey and white with a red trim. Willow is a boat that says ‘I can escape in this and go fishing or do a bit of duck-shooting with my mates or with my kids’, it’s a male-bonding kind of boat.”

Harris said the boat show, now in its 16th year, draws a consistently high standard of entrants and is great motivation for people to restore old craft or build new boats on traditional designs.

Boat show organiser Pete Rainey said the sunny weather drew good crowds both days, and though the southerly prevented much on-water activity on Sunday there was good sailing by mid-afternoon.

Rainey said holding the show a month earlier than usual was popular with visitors, with some enjoying a day out at the lake after attending the Marlborough Wine and Food Festival. However he said the earlier time was more cluttered with events, which would be taken into account when deciding the date for next year’s show.

Other award winning boats were:

Best New Craft: Boat 67 (unnamed), a 13’ 8” ultra-light ply dinghy with total design and build by the owners, John and Dianne Macbeth, Todd Valley, Nelson.

Best Restoration: Andiamo, a 18’ 6” power boat built in 1949 and based at Lake Rotoiti (NI) over 60 years ago, where it was one of the fastest boats on the lake, owned by Mary Fuller of Tauranga

Port Nelson House Parts best rowed craft: Inverie, a 12’ 1947 traditional clinker dinghy, owned by the Picton Clinker & Classic Boat Club.

CWF Hamilton trophy for best jet propelled boat: Potential, a 4.5m Hamilton jet 30XL, built in 1964 and now owned by Geoff Neutze of Christchurch

Johnson Family Trophy for the best sail powered craft: Julie, a 14’ X-class built in 1950, owned by Guy Manning of Nelson.

Mathieson/Jeffcott trophy for best motor powered craft: Matariki, a 5m launch built in 1965 and restored in 2014, owned by Marlene & Peter Crapper of Picton.

Best outboard motor boat: Miss Molly, a 13’ Clinker runabout built in 1963 and owned by Dick & Rita Hall of Picton.

Eventiac best themed display: Thunderbird, a 15’ 1972-73 jet boat, bought as a bare hull for $500 in 2006, returned to red and white colour scheme and relaunched in 2006; entry included music and costumes, owned by Edward Wicken of Christchurch.

Ron Culley trophy for best steam boat: Tecumseh, a 17’ 9” steam launch built in 2003 by Myron Givets, owned by Tony Collins of North Otago.

People’s Choice: Vanquish, a 19’ powerboat, a new build by the owner over a period of seven years, in the style of a 1930s-40s gentleman’s racer, owned by Dave Deavoll of Christchurch.

ENDS

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