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Top 10 Valentine's Day celebrations around the world

12 February 2014

Top 10 Valentine's Day celebrations around the world

A dozen red roses, a box of chocolates and a romantic dinner are among the ways we usually spoil our significant other on Valentine’s Day.

But ever wondered how it’s done in other parts of the world?

Youth travel operator Topdeck has put together a list of different ways Valentine’s Day is celebrated around the globe, from the giving of all things pig-related to hurling oranges in a river in a bid to find ‘the one’…

South Korea, 14th of every month: Expect to be busy on the 14th of every month, which isrecognised as a way to celebrate love or mourn the lack thereof. Rose Day, Photo Day, Hug Day and Movie Day are just the beginning. Singles get together on April 14 to eat black bean noodles and commiserate each other’s misfortune.

Argentina, July 13-20: Why settle for a day when you can have seven? In addition to February 14, those passionate tango-loving Argentinians have set aside an entire week in July to show their love by exchanging candies and kisses during what’s dubbed ‘Sweetness Week’.

Germany, February 14: Apart from the stock standard roses and chocolate, Germans have turned pigs into their own little Valentine’s cupid. Representing luck and lust, it can be given in picture form, miniature statues, in chocolate or however one sees fit.

Malaysia and Singapore, February 14: The Lantern Festival on the 15th day of the Lunar New Year can be regarded as a version of Valentine’s Day. Single women write their number on an orange and throw it in a river for single men to collect and eat. The taste is an indication of their possible love. Sweet represents a good fate. Sour? It’s doomed.

Japan, February 14, March 14: February 14 is all about the man in Japan. Women give chocolate to all men around them ranging from love interests to co-workers and bosses. Luckily, roles are reversed on ‘White Day’ a month later.

China, August 2: The seventh day of the seventh month of the lunar calendar is set aside for a visitto “matchmaker temples”, where those in love and singles alike pray for luck in love, happiness and marriage.

Taiwan, August 2: Love is a number’s game in Taiwan. Men are expected to give bouquets of flowers to their beloved with the number of flowers representing an important message - one rose means “one love”, 99 roses means “forever” while a whopping 108 roses signifies popping the question.

Italy, February 14: Italian romantics show their love for each other on “La Festa Degli Innamorati (or the holiday of lovers) by attaching padlocks to bridges and throwing away the key. Che romantico!

Brazil, June 12: One tradition practiced by young women on the eve of Dia dos Namorados, or “Day of the Enamoured”, is to write the names of their crushes on pieces of paper, fold them up and put them away in a hat or container. Whichever name they pick from the pile the following day determines who they should marry. Or at least go on a few dates with.

Finland, February 14: Valentine’s Day is called Ystavanpaiva, which translates into “Friend’s Day”. The day has no romantic meaning; instead people send cards and gifts to their friends in celebration of their friendships.

www.topdeck.travel

ENDS

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