Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Borderland: The world of James Cowan

Borderland: The world of James Cowan

Exhibition at the Turnbull Gallery, National Library Wellington, cnr Molesworth and Aitken Sts, 17 February – 26 April 2014

A new exhibition in the Turnbull Gallery showcases newly acquired papers and photos from the writer whose work inspired Geoff Murphy's acclaimed 1983 film, Utu.

James Cowan (1870-1943) grew up on a farm in the Waikato, on land confiscated from Māori who had fought against the Crown in the Waikato War of the 1860s. The farm included part of the famous battlefield of Ōrākau, just north of the region that remained in Māori control after the war – the King Country. The exhibition coincides with the 150th anniversary of Ōrākau.

The exhibition’s curator, Ariana Tikao also has a family connection to Cowan: “My personal interest in James Cowan began with the book he wrote based on interviews with my great-grandfather, Hone Taare Tikao, called Māori Folk-tales of the Port Hills” said Tikao.

Cowan wrote prolifically about many areas of New Zealand cultural life and was one of New Zealand’s most widely-read authors in the first half of the twentieth century. His story A Bush Court-Martial inspired the Geoff Murphy epic 1983 film Utu which recently had a re-release as Utu redux. Tikao sees the potential for many more new works being created, based on Cowan’s substantial output.

“Although some of his wording can appear outdated now, much of his writing is still highly readable, and the level of detail he wrote based on oral accounts is quite a feature of his writing, ” said Tikao. “Before I worked on the exhibition, I created and recorded a new waiata based on Māori lyrics I had found in Māori Folk-tales of the Port Hills”.

There is an events programme to accompany the exhibition as well as a one-day symposium co-hosted by the Alexander Turnbull Library and the Centre for Colonial Studies, Otago University on 21 February, at the National Library in Wellington.

Information about the symposium: Cultural Go-Between, Colonial Man: New Perspectives on James Cowan: http://natlib.govt.nz/events/new-perspectives-on-james-cowan

Link to exhibition webpage and other associated events: http://natlib.govt.nz/visiting/wellington/the-turnbull-gallery

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Werewolf: Music Criticism As A Dating Metaphor

Music criticism can be just another form of consumer advic... Yet ever since pop music criticism first entered the media mainstream it has played a wider role, too. Rather than a decree with a numerical score attached, this kind of criticism functions more like travel notes. A conversation, even a form of seduction. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Rushing For Gold

The first section focuses particularly on the Victorian connections – commercial, legal, mining and personal, including migration statistics. But for me the most interesting chapters were in the middle sections about the people of the goldfields. More>>

Comedy Festival Review: VOTE BATT

The political campaigning in the US over the last eight months or so has provided a stark insight into how far political candidates are willing to go. This background came into focus as “former comedian” – now politician – Tim Batt ushered people up into the front seats, passing out badges and taking photographs with his not entirely adoring public... More>>

HRH QEII's 90th: New Zealand Post Birthday Stamps Fit For A Queen

New Zealand Post is celebrating the Queen’s 90th birthday with a special series of stamps and a limited edition silver coin. The Queen was born on 21 April 1926. To mark her birthday, New Zealand Post has produced ‘lenticular’ or moving stamps that feature nine different images of the Queen on just three stamps. More>>

ALSO:

Anzac Day: A Time To Stand Against Hatred

The Human Rights Commission says ANZAC Day is a time for New Zealanders to remember those things our grandparents stood for and stand up against intolerance and prejudice. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news