Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Love In The Key Of Britpop

Love In The Key Of Britpop

They say when life gives you lemons, make lemonade. When life gave poet Emily Andersen a Britpop-related heartbreak, Emily made a Britpop-related heartbreak spoken word show.

Emily, who recently returned down under after two years living out her indie pop and poetry dreams in the UK, is excited to be bringing Love in the Key of Britpop to her new hometown Wellington as part of NZ Fringe Festival.

Love in the Key of Britpop debuted at the 2012 Edinburgh Festival Fringe, where the Scotsman described it as “A must-see for anyone who grew up in the 90s and enjoys playing ‘spot the lyrical reference’” and the BBC 6 Music Breakfast Show invited her on air to deliver the weekly Friday poem. In 2013, Emily performed the show at FRINGE WORLD Perth, Adelaide Fringe, Sydney Fringe and Melbourne Fringe.

Emily, a self-confessed Anglophile and British pop tragic, is keen to find out how a New Zealand audience receives her work. “I met heaps of Britpop and poetry fans in the UK and Australia doing this show, and had a beer and a music rave with quite a few in the bar afterwards, so I’m very much looking forward to meeting the indie kids of Wellington in February!”

Love in the Key of Britpop is a spoken word show telling the tale of young indie lovers experiencing a relationship through the prism of Britpop.

An anglophile Aussie girl meets her English Britpop prince in a Melbourne indie disco in the early hours of New Years Day 2006, and expects the couple to ride off happily into a 90’s sunset on matching vespas, waving union jacks and singing Girls and Boys all the way. But is singing along, hand on heart, to all the same favourite songs enough to sustain a relationship? Can any romance live up to the fantasies we create?

Emily performs a funny and poignant poetic narrative, set between Melbourne and London, exploring the place of music in relationships, and feminist conundrums and contradictions. This solo show is an ode to Britpop, nightclub romance, visa marriages, and anglophilic love.

**** “Andersen’s poetry has that magic ability to err between pithy one-liners and something more honest and bleak” Broadway Baby

“A must-see for anyone who grew up in the 90s and enjoys playing ‘spot the lyrical reference’” The Scotsman

Emily Andersen is an Australian poet who currently lives in Wellington, usually in Melbourne, and sometimes London, whose work is inspired by pop music, politics and place. Emily was mentored by the late, celebrated Australian poet Dorothy Porter between 2004 and 2005, and made her Edinburgh Festival Fringe debut in 2012 with her one-woman spoken word show Love in the Key of Britpop. She has performed her poetry on the BBC 6 Music breakfast show, as well as at spoken word events in the UK and Australia. Emily is such a British pop fangirl that her London flat is on the street where the video for the Verve’s Bittersweet Symphony was filmed.

www.loveinthekeyofbritpop.co.uk
@LoveKeyBritpop / facebook.com/britpoplove

LISTINGS INFORMATION – Love in the Key of Britpop at NZ Fringe Festival 2014

FEBRUARY 25 – MARCH 1, 7:00pm (55 mins)
FRINGE BAR, 26-32 Allen St, Te Aro, Wellington, 6011
TICKETING:
www.fringe.co.nz

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 
Werewolf: Katniss Joins The News Team

From the outset, the Hunger Games series has dwelt obsessively on the ways that media images infiltrate our public and personal lives... From that grim starting point, Mockingjay Part One takes the process a few stages further. There is very little of the film that does not involve the characters (a) being on screens (b) making propaganda footage to be screened and (c) reacting to what other characters have been doing on screens. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Ko Witi Te Kaituhituhi

Witi Ihimaera, the distinguished Māori author and the first Māori to publish a book of short stories and a novel, has adopted a new genre with his latest book. But despite its subtitle, this book is a great deal more than a memoir of childhood. More>>

Werewolf: Rescuing Paul Robeson

Would it be any harder these days, for the US government to destroy the career of a famous American entertainer and disappear them from history – purely because of their political beliefs? You would hope so. In 1940, Paul Robeson – a gifted black athlete, singer, film star, Shakespearean actor and orator – was one of the most beloved entertainers on the planet. More>>

ALSO:

"Not A Competition... A Quest": Chapman Tripp Theatre Award Winners

Big winners on the night were Equivocation (Promising Newcomer, Best Costume, Best Director and Production of the Year), Kiss the Fish (Best Music Composition, Outstanding New NZ Play and Best Supporting Actress), and Watch (Best Set, Best Sound Design and Outstanding Performance). More>>

ALSO:

Film Awards: The Dark Horse Scores Big

An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach An inspirational film based on real life Gisborne speed-chess coach Genesis Potini, made all the right moves to take out top honours along with five other awards at the Rialto Channel New Zealand Film Awards - nicknamed The Moas. More>>

ALSO:

Theatre: Ralph McCubbin Howell Wins 2014 Bruce Mason Award

The Bruce Mason Playwriting Award was presented to Ralph McCubbin Howell at the Playmarket Accolades in Wellington on 23 November 2014. More>>

ALSO:

One Good Tern: Fairy Tern Crowned NZ Seabird Of The Year

The fairy tern and the Fiji petrel traded the lead in the poll several times. But a late surge saw it come out on top with 1882 votes. The Fiji petrel won 1801 votes, and 563 people voted for the little blue penguin. More>>

Music Awards: Lorde Reigns Supreme

Following a hugely successful year locally and internationally, Lorde has done it again taking out no less than six Tuis at the 49th annual Vodafone New Zealand Music Awards. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news