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Contact Brings A Little Magic To A Wellington Icon

Wednesday 19 February 2014

Contact Brings A Little Magic To A Wellington Icon

Contact Energy is aiming to add a smile to the faces of Wellingtonians and tourists who ride the iconic Wellington Cable Car by transforming the journey into a magical lighting experience. The top cable car tunnel has been transformed into the Contact Light Tunnel, an enchanting light display for the duration of the New Zealand Festival season of Power Plant.

“It’s about having fun with energy and giving all Wellingtonians the opportunity to experience a bit of the excitement of the Power Plant event,” says Contact’s General Manager, Nicholas Robinson. “As a proud Wellington-based employer we’re delighted to support Power Plant at the Botanic Gardens, as part of the New Zealand Festival – an iconic event for the community in which our team work and live. It’s great to be able to add a bit of magic to people’s day. The Contact Light Tunnel is Wellington’s answer to the Waitomo glowworm caves!”

The unique Contact Light Tunnel display, created by artist Angus Muir, will be experienced by anyone using the Wellington Cable Car up until Sunday 16 March. Contact customers are able to enjoy one free return trip on the Cable Car for them and their travelling group by simply showing their Contact Energy bill at the ticket office.

The out-of-this-world lighting display is powered by 45 lighting strips running up and around the perimeter of the inside of the tunnel. Custom lighting sequences will see each lighting strip change colour, pulse and create patterns as the cable car passes through.

“I was trying to create something that’s a fun experience and shows that we’re having fun with energy,” Mr Muir. “There are around 15,000 individual lights which play all the way down the 100m tunnel. The cable car triggers the experience. It’s kind of like being in a warp tunnel with optical illusions and various effects running through it.”

The cable car is also the easiest way for people attending Power Plant to get to the event at the Wellington Botanic Garden, so if you’re attending make sure your plans include taking a ride.

About Power Plant:
Proudly partnered by Contact Energy, the New Zealand Festival season of Power Plant is a world famous light and sound experience at the Wellington Botanic Garden. Five international artists will convert the Garden – as they have done around the world – into a nocturnal magical space through innovative light and sound. It’s much more than just a walk in the park; it’s a feast of the senses. A must-see for all ages. The season of Power Plant runs from 28 February to 16 March. For ticket details and more information visit www.festival.co.nz/power-plant/.

About Contact Energy:
Contact is one of New Zealand’s largest electricity generators and retailers. We keep the lights burning, the hot water flowing and the BBQ fired up for around 566,000 customers across the country. Powering the country with electricity, natural gas and LPG, our team of around 1,100 live, work and operate in communities throughout New Zealand. www.contactenergy.co.nz

Wellington Cable Car hours:
Monday to Friday 7am - 10pm
Saturday 8:30am - 10pm
Sunday & Public Holidays 9am - 9pm

ENDS

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