Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


All Black was bodyguard for Lawrence Of Arabia

February 20, 2014

He was given the name Beethoven but his career wasn’t in classical music.

Instead Beethoven Algar could produce a symphony of sidesteps as a versatile All Black in the 1920s.

However he had an even more heroic career as a courageous member of the Imperial Camel Corps in the First World War and as bodyguard and escort for Colonel .T. E. Lawrence, later known as Lawrence of Arabia.

Beet Algar, who died in Levin at the age of 95, is included in the New Zealand Rugby Museum’s 15 All Blacks or provincial rugby players who were killed in or survived the First World War.

The 15 identities will be featured in a Balls, Bullets and Boots inter-active exhibition which the Palmerston North based museum plans to display in May next year and then tour through New Zealand on the way to the 2015 Rugby World Cup.

Beet Algar was chosen for the exhibition not just for representing Wellington in 1914 and then, from 1919 to 1922, but for his impressive war record and determination to return from serious injury on the battlefield at Gaza.

Beet was involved in three battles to secure Gaza and was wounded in the final battle which resulted in a four month recovery in a Cairo Hospital.

The Director of the New Zealand Rugby Museum, Stephen Berg, says Beet Algar appealed to him because of his courage and determination to put the war behind him and start a new life.

“Beet returned home and, as well as playing rugby at the top level where he represented the All Blacks in Australia and New Zealand, he became a builder,” he says.

“There’s something very special about the man who returned from the destruction of war and chose a profession where he could create and build something worthwhile.”

“Another milestone was his age. At the time of his death Beet Algar had been the oldest living All Black. ”

Stephen Berg says Beet is one of 15 enduring characters including the 1905 All Black captain, Dave Gallaher, who was killed in the Battle of the Somme, Bill Hardham VC and Philip “Dad” Bennett who enlisted at the age of 16 and then, after the war, returned to Nelson College to complete his education.

“These guys are inspiring, both the ones who died for their country and those who returned with a mission to start life afresh,” Stephen says.

Balls, Bullets and Boots is a $629,000 exhibition. The museum recently received $30,000 from the Eastern and Central Community Trust and has made application to the Lottery World War One Commemorations Environment and Heritage Committee for $434,000.

Stephen Berg expects to hear whether the submission has been successful by April.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Review: Singin’ In The Rain

Singin’ in the Rain , the wet and wonderful musical production all the way from London’s West End, officially opened at St. James Theatre in Wellington. More>>

Francis Cook: Gallipoli: The Scale Of Our War – First Look

Te Papa today allowed media access to their new exhibition Gallipoli: The Scale of Our War . The exhibition was curated with help from Weta Workshop to deliver an immersive, realistic and even disorienting experience. More>>

ALSO:

Bats Theatre: Letters From The Front Brings ANZAC Letters Alive

Inspired by centenary commemorations, improv troupe Best on Tap is producing a show based on real-life letters sent to and from New Zealand soldiers in the First World War. More>>

ALSO:

Publishing: Unity Books On Plan To Close Te Papa Press

Unity Books is alarmed that Te Papa is proposing to suspend publishing by Te Papa Press for 4 or 5 years. Te Papa Press has proven time and time again that it has both award and bestseller capability and fulfils its kaupapa. More>>

ALSO:

Cinema: ‘The Desk’ Featuring Paul Henry To Have NZ Debut

The Documentary Edge Festival is thrilled to announce The Desk as a late entry to its 2015 Programme. The film, featuring local broadcaster Paul Henry, will have its international premiere on May 21 at 10pm at Q Theatre (book now at qtheatre.co.nz) with limited screenings also on offer in Wellington and Auckland. More>>

ALSO:

Art: Considering Feminisms In Aotearoa New Zealand: Two Projects

Feminism is something that has changed our lives. Recently, the activist Marilyn Waring reviewed the impact of feminism in Aotearoa New Zealand and reminded us that just 40 years ago banks wouldn’t lend women money without the guarantee of a man, ... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news