Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


Mapping the OE phenomenon

Media Release

Otago University Press

Mapping the OE phenomenon

Jude Wilson’s new book Flying Kiwis: A history of the OE is the first detailed account of a uniquely Kiwi phenomenon: the extended overseas working holiday.

Drawing on the oral accounts of several hundred travellers, Wilson sheds light on the cultural development of the OE – from its emergence in the mid-1970s through to a peak in the late 1980s.

As the cost of long-haul flights came down and the rest of the world became more accessible, increasing numbers of young New Zealanders took off overseas.

‘In the beginning it was about travel and testing yourself in the bigger world,’ says author Jude Wilson. ‘In the 80s the OE morphed to include not only travel but also finding a proper job.’

Going on ‘the big OE’ became part of a young New Zealander’s rite of passage; New Zealand employers began to recognise it as an important milestone in a young person’s career.

During the 1980s London was the city of choice. Ex-pat newspapers and magazines provided a forum for travellers and a hub for networking. Areas in London, like Earls Court, became known as Kiwi zones – a place where new arrivals would hang out together.

Flying Kiwis is heavily illustrated with a colourful selection of archival material – from photographs to travel documents, signage, cartoons and travel mementos – giving a visual account of the popular culture that was integral to the OE’s evolution.

Thoroughly researched, laced with humour and entertaining anecdote, Flying Kiwis reveals how the OE became part of the Kiwi psyche. Never before has this crucial expression of Kiwi identity been so fully explored and recorded.

Flying Kiwis: A history of the OE

By Jude Wilson

ISBN: 978-1-877578-26-7, $45


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Leonardo da Vinci - The Graphic Work

The breadth of da Vinci’s work is incredible: from animals to weaponry, architecture to fabric, maps to botany. The works have been divided into themes such as Proportion Drawings, Anatomical Drawings and Drawings of Maps and Plans. Each section begins with a short essay. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: James Hector: Explorer, Scientist, Leader

Publication of this comprehensive 274-page account of the life and work of James Hector by the Geoscience Society of New Zealand marks the 150th anniversary of James Hector’s appointment as New Zealand’s first government scientist. More>>

On Shoestrings And Phones: Rossellini And Contemporary Film

Howard Davis: Roberto Rossellini's Neo-Realist Rome, Open City provides some fascinating technical parallels to Tangerine, an equally revolutionary Independent movie made exactly seventy years later. More>>

Art Review: Fiona Pardington's A Beautiful Hesitation

An aroma of death and decay perfumes this extraordinary survey of Fiona Pardington's work with faint forensic scents of camphor and formaldehyde. Eight large-format still-lifes dominate the main room, while other works reveal progressive developments in style and subject-matter. More>>

Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news