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‘Nga Korero o Ngātiwai’ – Book Launch

Media 21 February 2014

‘Nga Korero o Ngātiwai’ – Book Launch

Ka tangi a Tukaiaia ki te moana, kia tupato If you hear the cry of Tūkaiaia at sea, be wary,

Ka haere a Ngātiwai ki te moana as Ngātiwai are advancing upon the sea,

Ka tangi a Tukaiaia ki tuawhenua, kia tupato If you hear the cry of Tūkaiaia on land, be wary,

Ka haere a Ngātiwai ki tuawhenua as Ngātiwai are advancing upon the land

Ngātiwai Trust Board is delighted to launch its new book - ‘Nga Korero o Ngātiwai’- today at the Takahiwai Marae at One Tree Point in Ruakaka.

“This book is a collection or kohikohinga of stories and poems based on memories of Ngātiwai Kaumatua and Kuia as a way to strengthen our reo and tikanga,” says Ngātiwai Education’s Erica Wellington.

“It gives us the means to imbue our tamariki and rangatahi with enthusiasm and aroha for who they are and to support them in their learning and help them grow and reach their potential.”

The 93-page, A4-size, glossy soft-cover book contains traditional narratives, anecdotal tales and legends of 22 Kaumatua and Kuia, all of which is designed to bring a sense of pride and learning to the people of Ngātiwai.

In conjunction with this book Ngātiwai Trust Board has also produced a 20-page children’s version of the book.

“Both books give us another form of passing on traditional knowledge and understanding from one generation to another and we believe this gives us a powerful tool for inspiring Ngātiwai students to explore their heritage and tikanga,” say education team members. .

“It also helps us offer our Ngātiwai stories for teachers to use with students, and we encourage all Ngātiwai schools to access, through their Ngātiwai students, the many resources available in our whanau, hapu and marae.”

The book also acknowledges Tūkaiaia the principal Kaitiaki or guardian of the Ngātiwai. Maori tradition says the cry of Tūkaiaia would always herald the arrival of the people of Ngātiwai.

The whakatauki comes from an era when Ngātiwai identity was strong in te reo o Ngātiwai and tikanga Ngātiwai.

Ngātiwai want once again to be heard with confidence upon the land and upon the sea; and by doing that strengthen the voice of Tūkaiaia that is synonymous with the Ngātiwai voice.

“To help achieve this, we are working to include Ngātiwai matauranga in schools and learning centres. It has been our privilege to hear the many childhood memories of our people and to be entrusted with the work of writing and publishing these stories.”

To order copies of the book please contact the Ngatiwai Trust Board at .

Available for $30 or $10 (children’s version).


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