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Dunedin Fringe show "visually stunning"; "must-see"

Shani Dickins (Auckland)
presents
Demigod/half-Human
Play human. Avoid taboo. Shed the primordial skin.
A harrowing and provocative choreography about power, temptation, and disguise.
[Watch promotional video here]

Following seasons at Body Festival, Hamilton Fringe and NZ Fringe, Auckland choreographer Shani Dickins brings to Dunedin a dark, visceral and “very, very scary” story of ritual and taboo.

Winner of the Wallace Arts Emerging Artist Award at Auckland’s Short + Sweet Dance Festival, Demigod/half-Human is filled with provocative imagery. The show references the fall of Eve, female demon Lilith and over 40kgs of apples, the smell of which permeate the performance.

“… so full of the confronting, the unexpected and the taboo
… alien meets exorcist, in an Hieronymus Bosch garden of earthly delights and horrors.”
- Theatreview

“Make no mistake. These women can dance.”
- The Press

A “visually stunning” collaboration by several bold young artists, Demigod/half-Humanfeatures original music by Canadian musician James Risbey, costumes by AUT fashion graduate Fraser Mildon, lighting design by Ruby Reihana-Wilson, and compelling performances from dancers Jahra Wasasala and Rosa Provost (originally from Christchurch).

Choreographer Dickins, lighting designer Reihana-Wilson and producer Natalie Maria Clark have all previously been involved with Dunedin Fringe, including shows How To Make Friends and Still Appear Normal (2013), Faux Pas (2012) and I Heart (2011). “My experience of Dunedin Fringe has always been positive, whether as a performer, choreographer or producer,” states Clark. “There’s a lot of life in Dunedin during the festival.”

The Dunedin show will follow a season at Wellington’s iconic BATS Theatre, before heading to the artist’s home city of Auckland for a final season at The Basement.

DEMIGOD/HALF-HUMAN plays:
13th - 15th March 2014, 8.30pm
Community Gallery, 20 Princes St., Dunedin
Tickets $12 (presales) from dashtickets.co.nz or $15 on the door.
Contains nudity.

Generous thanks to support from Dunedin Fringe, Creative NZ, Community Gallery and The Wallace Arts Trust.

facebook.com/DemigodhalfHuman

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