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Tiffany Singh - 6 – 29 March - Bartley + Company Art

Bartley + Company Art

TIFFANY SINGH
A mustard field of the mind
6 – 29 March 2014

You are warmly invited to attend the opening preview and to meet Tiffany

Thursday 6 March, 5.30 – 8pm


Click for big version.

The pungent phrase – a mustard field of the mind – from British novelist Hari Kunzru via Kiwi artist/writer Tessa Laird opens up the multiple possibilities inherent in Tiffany Singh’s art practice. What Laird has described as the “constant engagement with the aesthetics of elsewhere” in Singh’s work enables viewers to journey with all senses to a territory outside the usual ambit of contemporary New Zealand art.

Singh has carved out her own distinctive niche to create a installation based practice which embodies her heritage (Punjabi, Samoan, Maori and Pakeha) and her belief in the transformative power of art – both in its ability to engage people in creative conversations and acts and for its capacity to provoke reflections on such non-mainstream issues as the nature of the sacred. For Singh herself, the sacred is about samsara – the repeating cycle of life, death and rebirth. This is played out literally and metaphorically in her work with concepts and materials repeated, recycled, refreshed and reformatted across installations and exhibitions.

Since completing a Bachelor of Fine Arts with Honours at Elam School of Fine Arts, University of Auckland in 2008 Singh has exhibited nationally and internationally and has secured several residencies including the McCahon Residency and the Californian Montalvo Arts Centre Residency in 2013 and the Santa Fe Institute of the Art and the Kathmandhu Contemporary Arts Centre residencies in 2014.  A major collaborative public project Fly Me Up To Where You Are currently showing at Pataka Art Museum in Porirua was in the Auckland Arts Festival 2013 and will tour further in New Zealand and overseas. In late 2012 a year long project May the Rainbow Touch your Shoulder was launched at the Auckland Art Gallery and she exhibited major site specific projects as part of the 2012 Biennale of Sydney and the Contemporary Asian Art Biennial in Taiwan. In 2011 her work was included in Stealing the Senses at the Govett Brewster Gallery.

If you would like a copy of Tessa Laird's article in Art New Zealand, which provides a good overview of Tiffany's practice, please contact us.

Last days to see Judy Millar

These fabulously assured complex paintings will be moving out of the front gallery in a few days – if you haven't had a look yet be sure to visit us in the gallery or online. 


Click for big version.

Red Red Orange #1, oil and acrylic on canvas, 1790 x 1490 mm

ENDS

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