Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Writers Week presents experts on "the war to end all wars"

2014 Writers Week presents two experts on ‘the war to end all wars’


As part of a year of commemorations of the outbreak of World War I, the New Zealand Festival is pleased to host two of the finest military historians during Writers Week, 7-12 March.

On Saturday 8th March British-based professor Margaret MacMillan will discuss her latest book, The War that Ended Peace: How Europe Abandoned Peace for the First World War which has been described by former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright as “one of the finest books I have ever read on the causes of World War I”.

On 12th March The Great Adventure will be brought to life in a special event at the Film Archive when Lieutenant Colonel (rtd) Chris Pugsley will narrate film footage from WWI with live musical accompaniment.

MacMillan is Warden of St. Antony’s College and Professor of International History at the University of Oxford. Her books include Women of the Raj and international bestsellers Nixon in China and Peacemakers: The Paris Conference 1919 and its Attempt to End the War - “The story of Europe’s diplomatic meltdown has never been better told” (The Spectator). She won the 2002 Samuel Johnson Prize for Peacemakers. In her latest book, MacMillan argues that the WWI could have been avoided up to the last minute, and examines why Europe walked into this catastrophic conflict.

Pugsley is one of New Zealand’s leading military historians. A former Army officer, he resigned from the military shortly after writing his first book on Gallipoli to dedicate himself to a career as a historian. He has been a consultant to Maurice Shadbolt for Once on Chunuk Bair, taught military history at the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst and led field trips to the battlefields of Europe.

His publications include Gallipoli: The New Zealand Story (shortlisted for the Watties New Zealand Book of the Year 1984) and The Anzac Experience: New Zealand, Australia and Empire in the First World War (shortlisted for the Templer Medal 2005, Finalist in History, Montana New Zealand Book Awards 2005).

The Uses and Abuses of History: Margaret MacMillan
8 March 10.45am at Embassy Theatre
Tickets $18

The Great Adventure Ends: Christopher Pugsley
12 March 1.45pm at Embassy Theatre
Tickets $18


Ends


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

Review: The Magic Flute - Magic Moments

Max Rashbrooke: Mozart’s The Magic Flute is an extraordinary tale, blending a story of great solemnity, of elegant music and Masonic virtue overcoming hatred and discord, with elements of extreme silliness and pure fantasy. .. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: ‘Lovely Swans Of Art’

On Cillia McQueen's 'In a Slant Light': Diary-keeping forms the basis of much of this memoir – as with earlier poems – and we are led gracefully through the waves of her life as she sails through both rough and smooth waters. More>>

Scoop Review Of Books: From Here And There

Being Chinese: A New Zealander’s Story
by Helene Wong.
This is the fascinating story of Helene Wong, born in 1949 in Taihape to Chinese parents: her mother, born soon after her parents migrated here, and her father, born in China but sent to relatives in Taihape at seven to get an education in English. More>>

Chiku: Hamilton Zoo's Baby Chimpanzee Named

Hamilton Zoo has named its three-month-old baby chimpanzee after a month-long public naming competition through the popular zoo’s website. The name chosen is Chiku, a Swahili name for girls meaning "talker" or "one who chatters". More>>

Game Over: Trans-Tasman Netball League To Discontinue

Netball Australia and Netball New Zealand have confirmed that the existing ANZ Championship format will discontinue after the current 2016 season, with both organisations to form national netball leagues in their respective countries. More>>

NZSO Review: Stephen Hough Is Perfection-Plus

He took risks, and leant into the music when required. But you also felt that every moment of his playing made sense in the wider picture of the piece. Playing alongside him, the NZSO were wonderful as ever, and their guest conductor, Gustavo Gimeno, coaxed from them a slightly darker, edgier sound than I’m used to hearing. More>>

ALSO:

Howard Davis Review: King Lear At Circa

In order to celebrate it's 40th birthday, it is perhaps fitting that Circa Theatre should pick a production of 'King Lear,' since it's also somewhat fortuitously Shakespeare's 400th anniversary. If some of the more cerebral poetry is lost in Michael Hurst's streamlined, full throttle production, it's more than made up for by plenty of lascivious violence designed to entertain the groundlings. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news