Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search


Virtual Speed Camera helps slow down trucks outside schools

Virtual Speed Camera helps slow down trucks outside schools

EROAD is helping transport operators drive down speeds in high-risk areas with its new Virtual Speed Camera.

Operators are now able to pinpoint areas of risk and apply their own speed limits to those areas for their drivers. They may be the same as the posted speed limit for the zone, or set lower to encourage extra vigilance around areas such as schools. Once they’ve set up a Virtual Speed Camera, operators can monitor speeds in those zones on any web-enabled device.

EROAD customers have been quick to introduce a new level of vigilance around high-risk areas, recording an average speed reduction of 9% in the speed zones they have created since the Virtual Speed Camera was released in December.

While variable speed limits have been set on roads outside many schools, they apply at certain times of day only, and can be difficult to enforce. Schools in rural areas and small towns are more at risk, with drivers having less time to reduce speed from open road limits.

Gradon Conroy, managing director of Designwindows in Hokitika, saw a problem with schoolchildren wandering onto the town’s roads, and decided to do something about it.

"For the first few days of using the Virtual Speed Camera, I was receiving speed alerts for 52-53km/hour. That's now dropped, so the drivers are certainly slowing down and keeping to the speed limit,” Conroy says.

Operators are able to use Virtual Speed Camera to monitor the speed of any of their vehicles that have EROAD hardware devices installed. If a driver exceeds a speed limit, a notification is immediately emailed to their company via EROAD’s web application.

Whanganui-based Dairy Fresh has incorporated Virtual Speed Camera into its driver incentive programme which rewards drivers for helping to reduce risk.

“Some of our own kids attend the schools that we’re setting reduced speed limits around, so it’s a no-brainer,” Managing Director Nick Walker says.
“EROAD is committed to making roads safer for schools, parents and local communities,” Steven Newman, EROAD CEO, says. “We’re in a unique position of being able to provide transport operators with tools to help address driver behaviour and improve public safety. We’re very excited about Virtual Speed Camera’s ability to reduce risk to the public.”

Transport operators create Virtual Speed Cameras in EROAD’s web application by drawing geofences around areas where they want to monitor speed. They can also opt to monitor speed over time rather than via notifications, with over speed reports generated by the web application.


© Scoop Media

Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines


13/10: 40 Years Since The Māori Land March Arrived At Parliament

Traffic into Wellington came to a standstill as thousands of Māori and Pākehā streamed along the motorway into the capital on 13 October 1975, concluding the Māori land march to parliament. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: Before The Quakes

Remembering Christchurch: Voices from decades past: The Christchurch I lived in for my first 23 years was where four-year-olds walked alone to kindergarten, crossing roads empty of all but a couple of cars per hour. My primary school, Ilam, was newly built on a grassy paddock surrounded by rural land... More>>

6-11 October: New Zealand Improvisation Festival Hits Wellington

Wellingtonians will have a wide selection of improv to feast on with a jam packed programme containing 22 shows, three companies from Australia, two companies from Auckland, one from Nelson, one from Christchurch and seven from Wellington. More>>


Bird Of The Year: New Zealanders Asked To Vote For Their Favourite Native Bird

Te Radar, David Farrier, Heather du-Plessis Allan and Duncan Garner are just some of the New Zealanders championing their favourite native bird in Forest & Bird’s annual Bird of the Year competition, which kicks off today.. More>>


Werewolf Film: It Follows - Panic In Detroit

Philip Matthews: When you heard last month that Wes Craven had died and you wanted to pay homage, you could have sat down with any one of five of his films that helped reinvent American horror at least three times over three decades... Or you could just have watched one of the greatest recent horror films that would probably not exist without Craven. More>>


Werewolf Music: Searching For The White Wail - On Art Pepper, etc

If the word ‘hipster’ means anything – which it arguably doesn’t – it seems to be more of an impulse than a condition. One always headed for the margins, and away from the white-bred, white-bread mainstream... More>>


Get More From Scoop



Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news