Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


New Zealanders to plant over 10000 pohutukawa & rata in 2014

New Zealanders to plant over 10,000 pohutukawa and rata in 2014

This year, volunteers in communities all around New Zealand will plant more than 10,000 eco-sourced pohutukawa and rata trees following the 2014 Project Crimson Community Restoration Programme which has recently opened for applications.

The Project Crimson Trust reviews applications from groups and individuals throughout New Zealand who aspire to create a long-term benefit to their local community through conservation projects involving eco-sourced pohutukawa and northern or southern rata trees. As well as trees, Project Crimson can provide funding to support a range of activities including fencing, possum control, site preparation and ongoing care and maintenance. The Trust also supports research designed to improve understanding of the ecology, or management options for pohutukawa and rata.

“Project Crimson has been working in communities for 24 years, and over this time we have planted well over 600,000 native trees. Our approach has always been to ‘teach a man to fish’ rather than ‘give a man a fish’. As a result communities all over New Zealand are not only learning how to take care of their local ecosystems, but are taking ownership of them. This has always been Project Crimson’s goal. Our work aims to engage communities in the importance of the work, educate and advise them, provide support as a catalyst and encourage self sufficiency. For some of our projects we are proud to have provided support for years, where others only require assistance for a short time frame” says Project Crimson’s Communications Manager, Melanie Seyfort.

The annual funding round closes on 1 May 2014. To apply go to www.projectcrimson.org.nz or contact the Project Crimson office on 0800 764 888 for further detail.

Background
The Project Crimson Trust is a leading conservation organisation in New Zealand, established in 1990. Project Crimson have made impressive progress re-establishing pohutukawa and rata nationwide by planting trees, coordinating and supporting a wide range of maintenance activities, scientific research, possum control programmes and public education.

Project Crimson is supported by the Department of Conservation, Mazda and the Mazda Foundation, Ata Rangi wines, Rata by Josh Emett and Biolage hair products.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

We Have The Technology: Zephyrometer Up And Moving

“The needle’s stoppers had to be repaired because of the extra impact caused by the balance not being correct. We also added an extra 300kgs counter-balance – made from zinc coated steel triangle plates. These adjustments will now stop it bending low over the road in high winds.” More>>

ALSO:

Waitangi Day: Treaty Of Waitangi - Found In Translation

To celebrate the Society of Translators and Interpreters's 30th anniversary, over 90 translators will work together to translate the English and Māori versions of the Treaty of Waitangi into 30 languages... More>>

ALSO:

Northland Development: Trust Applauds $4m Government Funding For Art Centre

Today's announcement of central government support, made by Minister of Economic Development Steven Joyce, provides a key step forward in funding for Whangarei’s Hundertwasser Art Centre & Wairau Maori Art Gallery. More>>

ALSO:

Memorial: 85th Anniversary Of 1931 Napier Earthquake

Civil Defence Minister Nikki Kaye will today attend the 85th anniversary afternoon tea for survivors of the 1931 Napier earthquake, to pay tribute to the heroism, kindness and generosity shown by many during this and more recent emergencies. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Images: 2016 Wellington Seven Costumes

On the last day of the 2016 Wellington Sevens, a sunny day saw the Stadium and waterfront quiet – at least compared to previous years. But there were still a range of traditional and novel dresser-uppers to be spotted. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news