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SKYCITY NZ Breakers go bald for Shave for a Cure

SKYCITY NZ Breakers go bald for Shave for a Cure

Seven of SKYCITY NZ Breakers team have a lot less hair after braving a shave yesterday as part of Leukaemia & Blood Cancer New Zealand’s Shave for a Cure campaign.

Gary Wilkinson, CJ Bruton, Duane Bailey, Jarrod Kenny, Alonzo Burton, assistant coach Paul Henare and CEO Richard Clarke parted with their locks to raise money to help the 6 kiwis diagnosed with a blood cancer or related condition every day.

“For me the decision to shave was really simple. It’s an easy way for me to be able to help so many people and assist LBC who do such amazing work. I just wish I still had had my ponytail,” says SKYCITY NZ Breakers Assistant Coach Paul Henare.

Close to 1,300 people across the country have signed up to Shave for a Cure, with that number expected to grow both during and after Shave Week which runs from 17 - 23 March. To date close to $350,000 has been raised.

The funds raised through Shave for a Cure enable Leukaemia & Blood Cancer New Zealand, who receive no Government funding, to support patients and families living with blood cancers and blood conditions free of charge across the country.

“We are incredibly grateful to the SKYCITY New Zealand Breakers for getting behind Shave for a Cure,” says LBC’s Chief Executive Officer, Pru Etcheverry.

“Shave provides a fantastic way to really make a difference, and show you care, as so many New Zealanders have been affected by a blood diagnosis,”

The SKYCITY NZ Breakers have already raised close to $1,300 for Shave for a Cure. Visit the SKYCITY NZ Breakers Shave for a Cure page here: .

People can sign up to Shave for a Cure at


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