Art & Entertainment | Book Reviews | Education | Entertainment Video | Health | Lifestyle | Sport | Sport Video | Search

 


Reminder on how to deal with koiwi

Reminder on how to deal with koiwi


Take note and report – that’s the message from the New Zealand Historic Places Trust (NZHPT) to anyone that finds koiwi tangata (human remains).

The message follows the discovery of a human skull and other bones on Nelson shoreline on Sunday. The bones are estimated to be between 50 and 150 years old.

NZHPT Central Region Archaeologist David Rudd says while people may have a naturally inquisitive nature it is important they are aware of what to do when finding koiwi tangata.

“It’s important to contact the local police as soon as koiwi tangata are found. They will contact NZHPT and local iwi and together they will evaluate whether the remains are a crime scene or historic in origin. Any recovery and investigation should be left to the experts.”

The NZHPT, which administers the management of archaeological sites, has a relationship with tangata whenua, police and local authorities. Each of the three police communication units (Northern, Central and Southern) have contact phone numbers for designated NZHPT regional archaeologists.

If the remains are considered to be pre-1900 and likely to be tangata whenua, the NZHPT will liaise with the appropriate iwi or hapu. Mr Rudd says the NZHPT share concerns with iwi that burial sites are treated with respect, and that handling and removing of koiwi tangata and historical artefacts did not become targets for fossickers.

“If you find what you think is koiwi tangata or an archaeological artefact it’s important that you leave it where it is, take note of its location and report it as soon as possible,” says Mr Rudd.

He says appropriate respect should be given, which included avoiding the temptation to take close-up photos of the discovery and then share them on social media.

The NZHPT has a guideline document available on how to deal with koiwi tangata available at www.historic.org.nz. The discovery of human bones is not uncommon given the increasing development of coastal areas previously occupied by Maori and the level of natural erosion that often exposes koiwi tangata.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Culture Headlines | Health Headlines | Education Headlines

 

NZ On Air TV Funding: More Comedy Comes Out Of The Shadows

Paranormal Event Response Unit is a series conceived by Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi as a TV spin-off from their highly acclaimed feature film What We Do In The Shadows. More>>

ALSO:

Mars News: Winners Announced For The 2016 Apra Silver Scroll Awards

Wellington singer-songwriter and internationally acclaimed musician Thomas Oliver has won the 2016 APRA Silver Scroll Award with his captivating love song ‘If I Move To Mars’. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Salt River Songs by Sam Hunt

Colin Hogg, a longtime comrade of Sam, writes in his Introduction that, ‘There is a lot of death in this collection of new poems by my friend Sam Hunt. It’s easier to count the poems here that don’t deal with the great destroyer than it is to point to the ones that do.’ More>>

Electronica: Restoring The World’s First Recorded Computer Music

University of Canterbury Distinguished Professor Jack Copeland and UC alumni and composer Jason Long have restored the earliest known recording of computer-generated music, created more than 65 years ago using programming techniques devised by Alan Turing. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Review Of Books: Almost Getting Away With Murder

The Black Widow by Lee-Anne Cartier: Lee-Anne Cartier is the sister of the Christchurch man found to have been murdered by his wife, Helen Milner, after an initial assumption by police that his death, in 2009, was suicide. More>>

Howard Davis: Triple Echo - The Malevich/Reinhardt/Hotere Nexus

Howard Davis: The current juxtaposition of works by Ralph Hotere and Ad Reinhardt at Te Papa perfectly exemplifies Jean Michel Massing's preoccupation with the transmigration of imagery in a remarkable triple echo effect... More>>

Get More From Scoop

 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
Culture
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news