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Support Wellington’s Urban Kai Cycle from the ground up

Support Wellington’s Urban Kai Cycle from the ground up

13 March 2014

As local food week dawns, a vibrant young woman with a contagious energy needs your help to create a new kind of clean-green with her ‘Urban Kai’ project.

Born and bred in California, Ania Upstill is passionate about the potential of Wellington’s scenery and people.

“Wellington is a fabulous city. It’s vibrant and creative, and it’s beautiful. But there’s too much waste!,” says Ania. “A visit to the landfill will show you we’re still throwing away too much good stuff, and we want to help. We literally will come and take away your scraps.”

The inspiration behind Urban Kai, says Ania, is to reduce waste and give the community access to local food by growing good healthy food on urban farm sites around Wellington.

“The cycle begins on our bicycles! We’ll pick up food scraps on our bikes from businesses and homes. The scraps will be turned into compost, which will help to grow fresh fruit and vegetables. The produce will be sold to cafes, restaurants and to the public through retail outlets to begin the cycle again. Any profits will help to fund the Local Food Network.”

An edible gardener by trade, Ania has poured a whole lot of enthusiasm and determination into the project. “It makes so much sense to create growth from waste, and bring food production into the city. I’m passionate about the community spirit this project will invoke,” says Ania. “It will be so satisfying to see people getting involved and understanding how their food is grown and where it comes from. The kids will love it!”

To kick start the project, Ania and friends want to raise $4,000 to get the compost programme running. “First things first. We need a big trailer for our bikes to help with the compost collection. As the company grows, so might our vehicles, but to begin with, a bike-powered food scrap collection will be part of the fun. We’ll be hugely grateful for any support you can give.”

To pledge your support, please visit PledgeMe before Wednesday 19 March: https://www.pledgeme.co.nz/projects/1845

ENDS

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